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With 2 DHCP servers on LAN, printer doesn't see \\PC-name but sees IP address

Posted on 2010-08-20
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Last Modified: 2012-05-10
My Networking knowledge has grown stale again,
basically we have a router on our network with built-in DHCP server that allocates addresses 192.168.0.1 - 200,
then we have a Windows Server 2008 on the server with also a DHCP server that allocates addresses 192.168.0.201 - 255.
Our printer (which I think deals primarily with the router) is .101 and I think it talks to the router.

The printer has a problem dumping a scanned document on \\OFFICE-PC\Scans,
but has no problem with other uses if we use their fixed IP addresses, e.g. \\192.168.0.212\Scans

Can you remind me of the phenomena of why a network device can't find another network device using \\  and therefore how I can solve this problem.
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Question by:rfwoolf
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by:MojoTech
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What is the printer using for DNS?
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by:rfwoolf
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Well I'm uncertain exactly how to determine that because the router has DNS settings and the Windows Server also has a DNS running, and I can't see anything in the Printer's webpage if I log into it.
However, my guess would be it's using the router's.
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by:MojoTech
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I think you should scrap anything that the router is doing in regards to DNS and DHCP and get everything looking at the server for DNS, when all the clients register with the server then will register with DNS etc and you will not have these issues. Configure the printer to use the servers DNS also.


you have a confused set up

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by:rfwoolf
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I've looked at the DHCP Leases table on both the router and the Windows server and I don't see the Printer's reservation of .192.168.0.101, and yet I can access the printer at that address. :S
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by:MojoTech
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It might be manually configured.
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by:TechHammer
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I agree with mojo, take the DHCP function out of the router and have it all allocate from the server.  For whatever reason, the router and the server are not sharing your routing tables.
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by:rfwoolf
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As per the question:
"Can you remind me of the phenomena of why a network device can't find another network device using \\  and therefore how I can solve this problem"

From what I'm picking up, the PC will try to resolve \\OFFICE-PC by talking to its DNS. How does it determine who the DNS is?
I think in this case one of the router's DNS's are set to the Windows Server's IP address.
And then I think the Windows Server DNS has its own set of DNS addresses.
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by:MojoTech
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It determins what the DNS server is because it is either assigned by DHCP or it is statically configured.
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by:rfwoolf
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Cool.. I didn't know DHCP Servers offered DNS addresses :p
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by:MojoTech
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It can offer many things, the common ones are ip address, dns server address's and default gateway but it can do more, your servers DHCP will be the more powerfull and configurable.
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Fred Marshall earned 325 total points
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I think it's important to distinguish between local name service and internet DNS.  The fact that you have a "Server" complicates this a bit and people make assumptions.

Your problem with the printer name is that you aren't getting local name service.  Try pinging various hosts by their names and see what happens.  What does My Network Places show?  

- In the TCP/IP settings for each computer and printer and..... it is perfectly OK for the DNS addresses to be internet DNS server IP addresses with no mention of local name servics at all.  This is a very common situation in simple networks.  The local name service might be provided by NetBIOS .... a topic unto itself.
- The typical router won't ever be engaged in local name service.
- It is typical for a router to provide DNS server addresses via DHCP.  Very often it is the router's own local IP address but routers can be set up too provide some external DNS server public IP address.  This has nothing to do with local name service.
- A typical Server might well be engaged in local name service by a variety of methods.
- It's common for local name service to be provided in a peer-to-peer fashion with one of the computers elected to be the Master Browser which provides the list of names and local name service.

So, you should learn just how your particular network is providing local name service.  There's a tool called BROWMON that may help.

Another point:
If you have 2 DHCP servers then there is no control over which one will provide an address to any particular client.  Of course, since you didn't overlap the ranges, you can tell by simply checking.  Some folks discourage the kind of setup that you have and I'd mildly agree with them as it can only add to the confusion at times like this.  I'd just turn one off.

As far as the apparent static printer IP address, it's good practice to not assign static addresses within the DHCP range.  I'd change the DCHP range accordingly to deal with this.  If you don't have enough addresses in the DHCP pool by doing it this way then change the printer IP address - which can be a pain if a number of computers have installed the printer using this specific IP address ... they would all have to be changed.
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by:rfwoolf
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by:rfwoolf
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I took the router and 'relayed' the DHCP server to the Windows Server
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