linux Centos server

I have installed Linux Centos 5 , i don't remember being prompted to select  between a server or a workstation.
Now how can I tell if it's a server or a workstation, and how to revert it a server if it's a workstation.

I also have tried the command ifconfig and it didn't give anything, what should be wrong?

thanks
jskfanAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
torimarConnect With a Mentor Commented:
It may be the sudo command that it doesn't find. If I remember correctly, sudo is not installed by default on RH-type systems.
In order to change your shell to a root shell (if you aren't logged in as root), type:
su -
then enter the root password.
0
 
Todd GerbertConnect With a Mentor IT ConsultantCommented:
Whether it's a server or a workstation is largely a matter of how you use it.  For example, if you did initially set it up as a workstation the installer likely would just select a set of programs to install that are most commonly found on a workstation, but there's nothing stopping you from removing the word processing programs and installing a web server after the fact and then your installation is now the same as if you selected server during setup (I'm over-simplifying a bit, but that's the basic idea).
ifconfig might be only in the super-users path, which means you'd need to logon as root, or use su or sudo, or you might not have network drivers installed/working.
0
 
jskfanAuthor Commented:
ACTUALLY NONE OF THE COMMAND LINE WORKS.

except when I run ls command , it shows Desktop directory
0
The 14th Annual Expert Award Winners

The results are in! Meet the top members of our 2017 Expert Awards. Congratulations to all who qualified!

 
jskfanAuthor Commented:
I thought a server doesn't have a GUI.

regarding the command lines, I guess I am a root user, though I have started the linux OS for a few times and didn't prompt me for user name and password
0
 
jskfanAuthor Commented:
I guess the command lines related to the network have issues, such as ifconfig and route
0
 
Todd GerbertIT ConsultantCommented:
Servers can have GUI's, and workstations can be installed without a GUI.
There is only one root user, and his name is always root
You're probably being logged on automatically as whatever username you created during install, and you should have chosen a root password?
0
 
Todd GerbertIT ConsultantCommented:
They're probably just not running because you're not root.  Try sudo ifconfig and enter the root password when/if prompted.
0
 
jskfanAuthor Commented:
I am checking the eth0 I guess it was deactivated I will activate it and see
0
 
Galtar99Connect With a Mentor Commented:
What do you want to do with it?  
You can use yum to install whatever you want, or remove it.
eg. yum install wget
 
0
 
torimarCommented:
There isn't really much difference between servers and workstations in Linux, as has already been said.
You could turn any workstation into a server and vice versa. The difference between server and workstation OS pretty much derives from the Windows world, where you need to buy a specific OS if you want server features, and where a non-server OS cannot be converted into a server.

A server version in a Linux distro often comes without a GUI simply because most servers are administered remotely via SSH on the command line, where a GUI would be of no use and only waste space.

If you actually sit in front of the server when you administer it, there is no point in not having a GUI. So there is nothing you need to change about your installation. Simply check whether all the server features/programs you need are installed, and if not, install them via "yum" or the graphical package manager.
0
 
jskfanAuthor Commented:
the eth0 is now showng active but when I enter sudo ifconfig it says:
command not found
0
 
jskfanAuthor Commented:
su -

it worked.

Thanks a lot
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.