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How do i determine if following are different subnets

Posted on 2010-08-20
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Last Modified: 2012-05-10
We have 240 remote location , each location is identifed with there  specific location number to identify there LAN For example site 1 have subnet of 1.1.1.0 site 2 have subnet 2.1.1.0 , i need to create three subnets per locations please tell me if following will categorize as different subnets
Location 1
1.1.1.1 255.255.255.0 Subnet 1 Location 1
1.1.2.1 255.255.255.0 Subnet 2 Location 1
1.1.3.1 255.255.255.0 Subnet 3 Location 1

Location 2
2.2.1.1 255.255.255.0 Subnet 1 Location 2

2.2.2.1 255.255.255.0Subnet 2 Location 2

2.2.3.1 255.255.255.0 Subnet 3 Location 2

Location 3
3.3.1.1 255.255.255.0 Subnet 1 Location 3

3.3.2.1 255.255.255.0 Subnet 2 Location 3

3.3.3.1 255.255.255.0 Subnet 3 Location 3

all the way too
240.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 Subnet 1 Location 240

240.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 Subnet 2 Location 240

240.1.3.0 255.255.255.0  Subnet 3 Location 240

I am worried about location 224 But i think i should be ok since mulicast address are 224.0.x.x.x

the reason behind this is that i need to create 3 vlan per location for segmentation puproses.

please respond

thanks
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Question by:liquidationworld
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4 Comments
 

Expert Comment

by:rkimball2000
ID: 33490485
The closest you can get is if you use;

10.1.x.x
10.2.x.x
10.3.x.x

1-127.x.x.x are reserved....including 10.x.x.x for private use(which we're allowed to use).

Unless you need over a million IP addresses at each location, this should work.
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LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:Galtar99
ID: 33490549
1-127.x.x.x is not reserved, 1.0.0.0 - 126.254.254.254 is available for use.  In fact they're used on the internet right now.  Just 127.0.0.0/8 is reserved for "loopback purposes" with 127.0.0.1 being a virtual loopback.
Most people when addressing internal networks use RFC1918 addresses because they're not routeable on the internet, so you know you won't be stepping on a website or some other internet resource.
10.0.0.0/8
172.16.0.0/12
192.168.0.0/16
But you can use any address range you want internally, just be aware you may be using something that's already in use on the internet so accessing that internet resource won't be readily available.
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Accepted Solution

by:
Galtar99 earned 500 total points
ID: 33490560
I would adopt a schema something like
Site 1:
10.1.1.0/24 10.1.2.0/24 10.1.3.0/24

Site 2:
10.2.1.0/24 10.2.2.0/24 10.2.3.0/24

Site 3:
10.3.1.0/24 10.3.2.0/24 10.3.3.0/24
...
Site 240:
10.240.1.0/24 10.240.2.0/24 10.240.3.0/24
It gives you room to grow, 252 more subnets per site, and 254 hosts per subnet and it gives you easy site identification since the site # or ID is built into the address.
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Author Comment

by:liquidationworld
ID: 33490602
Galtra
Have to identify site is the requirment here so i guess your suggestion is very usefull because 10.1.x.x and 10.2.x.x will easy to rememebr for my technical support staff, if location 127 would call they be able to tell that its ip would be 10.127.1.1 etc
excellent -i completely also agree with above two solutions but unfortunatly wont satisfy the requirment to identify sites by looking at IP address. but again all were very usefull solution , i thought i could use NAT to avoid steping on any toe but would like to keep things simple so i will go with Galtra's adivce.
also i am using 172.x.x.x addressing scheme for tunnel interfaces each location have 3 and using 192 for core servers could create confusion
172.16.0.0/12
192.168.0.0/16
thank you very much for all your help
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