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Find out version of BIND and how to update /etc/named.conf

Posted on 2010-08-22
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Last Modified: 2013-12-28
I will need to make some modifications to our DNS server that is running a version of BIND.

Here is my sanitized uname output:

bash-2.05$ uname -a
SunOS XXXX 5.9 Generic_118558-11 sun4u sparc SUNW,UltraAX-i2

First, I want to know the version of BIND because I am considering outsourcing our DNS. In the /etc/named.conf file, here is a snippet of the relevant line that is keeping me from finding out the BIND version:

options {
        version "I have no idea";

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I have tried the following three commands but could not find the version of BIND:

1. bash-2.05$ /usr/local/bind/etc/named -v

Result: No such file or directory. (This tells me that I am probably not running BIND 9.)

2. bash-2.05$ nslookup -q=txt -class=CHAOS version.bind. 0

Result: Get "I have no idea"

3. bash-2.05$ dig -t txt -c chaos VERSION.BIND @xxxx.xxxx.xxx

Result: Get "I have no idea"

The only thing that I can think of is to temporarily remove the "options - version" line which is not ideal. Is there any other way to find out without stopping any services?

Second, I need to modify the named.conf file to add some IPs for zone transfers. I know that when I modify a zone, I have to increment the SOA, find the BIND process number and kill it, then start it again with "/usr/local/bind/sbin/named -u kbind". Do I simply modify named.conf, save it, and then kill and start the BIND process the same way?

Thank you in advance for your help.
 
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Question by:SSAKUSEISHA
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by:aZLAn2000
aZLAn2000 earned 125 total points
ID: 33498535
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named -v to get version

Yes. You need to restart named to re-read the config.

Kill -HUP <processid>  - THis will make it restart and re-read the config files.

Good luck!
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by:aZLAn2000
ID: 33498546
OOpps.. didn't see your "-v " in your questions. Sorry 'bout that.

I found my version with vi as well. Just vi named and search for "version" and after a few searches it came up with the version. Chances are though that the "version" part is missing all along.

Since it SunOS you might check which version comes native with it or update it to the newest version ;)
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Jan Springer earned 125 total points
ID: 33500206
"named -v" is not good if the version that is listed first in the path is not the version that is running.

Find out by a "ps -Af |grep named" or viewing the startup script to find the correct location of named.

I don't know where SunOS puts its default installation but an install from source is, unless modified, is in /usr/local/sbin/named.
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by:SSAKUSEISHA
ID: 33506397
Thank you everyone - looks like I am running version BIND 9.3.1. I have attached a snippet of the output.

 

bash-2.05$ ps -Af |grep named

   kbind   149     1  0   Jun 11 ?       24:28 /usr/local/bind/sbin/named -u kbind

bash-2.05$ /usr/local/bind/sbin/named -v

BIND 9.3.1

bash-2.05$

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