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What else is required to allow user to set clock in Windows 7, local administrator is already granted.

A program used in my organization requires the user to have the ability to update the system clock.  I have already setup the user as a local administrator which used to allow the permission required in XP (power user also), but in Windows 7 this is not the case.  

What directory does the user need to have full permission on to set the clock?  Or what else is required to allow a program to update the system clock in Windows 7?  
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ehess
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ehess
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1 Solution
 
mismoboyCommented:
That is strange.  It should work.  Remember, if you restrict someone and they are a member of the local admin group, they should be able to undo what you did.  Anywho, here are a few things to check to make sure you can allow a user to change the system clock:

1. Go to Local Security Settings (Start, Run, SECPOL.msc) and expand Local Policies, User Right Assignment. There is an option for "Change the System Time", it should list the users, if not, then users cannot change the system time and you need to add them.
2. Go to C:\Windows\System32 and look got a file called timedate.cpl.   If this file don't list the users in the Security tab then you need to add it.
3.  The last thing to do is use the Windows 2003 Resource kit and run this command: ntrights.exe -r SeSystemtimePrivilege -u YourUserGroupName

Good Luck.
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sameeragayanCommented:
Sound like Group Policy Restriction

Make sure your users group has been added to the following
computer configuration/windows settings/security settings/local policies /user rights assignment /Change the system time
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mismoboyCommented:
sameeragayan,
Not trying to steal your fire buddy but your suggestion is already in Step #1 of my solution.
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sameeragayanCommented:
MISMOBOY,
I think you have taken the wrong idea here. I was talking about the Group Policies inherit from Domain Controller. Not the Local Security Policy settings in local (client) machine.

Hope you will understand this...
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ehessAuthor Commented:
Just to clarify this ntrights.exe -r SeSystemtimePrivilege -u YourUserGroupName revokes the permission, +r grants the permission.  
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ehessAuthor Commented:
The user can change the time, but I am still getting the error message from the user's program that the account doesn't have permission to update the system clock.  I followed the instructions from post 1 and took the GPO modications from post 2.
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mismoboyCommented:
shess,
You said user's program?  What program is the user using to update the system clock?
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ehessAuthor Commented:
It's a custom progress based database appliation.  The user having local admin permissions in Windows XP allowed the program to update the system clock, but in Windows 7 it's not allowing the same access.  
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mismoboyCommented:
Gotcha, XP do not use User Account Control (UAC), so you need to force the program to run as an Admin.  Test this, if you right-click and do a 'Run-As Adminstrator', is it able to change the clock then?  If so, your solution would be to shim the application by going to the Compatibility Tab in Properties of the EXE and check 'always run as administrator', the other fix is to use a Manifest file.  You can research about using a Manifest file from Microsoft's website or Bing or Google.  Good Luck.  

P.S. - Shim fixes one local PC.  For an enterprise, you will need to install the Shim database and deploy a local shim file to all PC's.  You can find out more about it on Microsoft's website.  
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