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huge image file- how to handle it

Posted on 2010-08-23
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Last Modified: 2013-12-02
if you face a huge image file, and it is going to take 18 DVDs to hold it, is it worth it? won't be a pain to bring all the data back?

DVDs are much cheaper, but costlier other ways..

any experience like this, and how did you handle it?

thanks
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Question by:anushahanna
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rockiroads earned 84 total points
ID: 33507065
why not backup to an external or network drive?
good thing about dvd's is no hardware failure and can put them away safe but overtime they may become unreadable
if you are going to backup on a regular basis then backing up to dvd's is not worth it as it would be too time consuming
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by:JeremySBrown
JeremySBrown earned 167 total points
ID: 33507068
You could put the image on a USB external hard drive. How big is the image file?
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by:JeremySBrown
JeremySBrown earned 167 total points
ID: 33507075
If you have multiple hard drives you can put the image on the different hard drives, in case one hard drive fails.
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by:zkrieger
zkrieger earned 83 total points
ID: 33507096
depends.

home network, i backup one computer to the next. all my machines have 300+ GB hard drives so storing a pair of ~45gb images isnt a big deal. I also have an older WD 160gb 2.5" external, it will hold one of each image for my 4 computers no problem.

I also copy critical data to 1 PC using windows backup, then syncronize those backups to carbonite. its a little pricey just for protection, but my work pays for part of it since i work from home as well.

At the office, our technicians have all been provided 300gb usb drives (2.5" so they dont need power) to copy image files to. our images are all stored on a VM server for their use with some SATA drives in a simple raid 5. they can copy down or upload new images as needed.
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by:siht
siht earned 83 total points
ID: 33507166
It's always painful to restore a large dataset, but if that's what you need to do then it's best to have a foolproof plan, and test it before you delete the original data.

Hard drives will easily handle 85GB and the restore will be relativley painless, as JeremySBrown has said keeping multiple copies is a good idea as drives fail all the time. Keep in mind that drives can degrade from not being used too, don't think you can store it for a few years and have it spin up. You'll want to change media every 6 months or so to be sure or just keep the drive active in a machine.

DVDs are a little more archival if you store them correctly but a pain to create in such numbers. Again multiple copoies would be advised in case one good scratch destroys your dataset.

Do you have access to tape, LTO or otherwise? LTO tape is achival rated for 30 years and a single LTO2 tape will hold 200 GB. A single tape LTO2 drive should not be too expensive these days.

Offsite storage? There are probably services in your area that can handle this data. The data would be stored on a well monitored RAID array in a secure location. Not cheap though.
zkreiger dispersion option is good too, and cheap. Keep copies all over the place on different media. You'd have to be very unlucky to loes all of them.
Just remember that if you only have one copy it's not backed up. It's really a question of what this data is worth to you.
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by:nobus
nobus earned 83 total points
ID: 33508249
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by:anushahanna
ID: 33510701
Phew.. lot of good points... Will remember them. Thank you.
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