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DHCP SBS 2008 issue

Hi all,

A quick question. We have bought a new SBS 2008 Server (this will be used as or mail server and network shares).

Before this arrived our netgear router was handling the DHCP.

Now when running the 'Connect to the internet' wizard on the sbs console.

It said it detected the router was hadling the DHCP and has asked me to disable this on the router. (which is fine i am happy for the server to handle all this).

Now, I'm probably just being over cautious (due to my lack of knowledge of SBS 2008),but the Issue I have at the moment is that the router assigns the previous IMAP mail server its IP address (in case you are wondering this was just an old xp machine running hmailserver an opensource program), this also has a couple of shares.

To avoid everyone not getting their mail for a while (if i do something wrong whilst configuring) and not being able to access shares I want to double check how I can then reassign the IP address through sbs 2008?

now if it helps the machine with the current mail and shares is on 192.168.0.5

Can someone put my mindat ease and clarify what i need to do to ensure the machine being used will still be assigned the 192.168.0.5 IP when the server takes over?

Thanks in advance,
 
Matt.

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flynny
Asked:
flynny
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2 Solutions
 
rhandelsCommented:
You can make a reservation in DHCP admin and use the MAC address of that machine and point it to the address you just stated or just make sure to create a statis IP address on that machine (is this possible) and make sure to create a DHCP pool of ip addresses that doens't hold that ip address in it (something like 192.168.0.50 - 192.168.0.150) if you don;t have more than 100 machines (which is an assumption because you have an SBS server).
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woolnoirCommented:
The reservation is one way of doing things, but potentially you might want to make the server IP address static and then as Rhandels above has mentioned you can exclude the IP address from the DHCP scope to ensure a lack of conflicts.

You may want to double check though, some ISP supplied routers have a pretty weird way of dealing with DHCP - if you use IP addresses that the inbuild dhcp server on the router didnt supply then NAT (address translation for your internet connection - assuming you use it ? ) may have issues.

So you have 2 options

1) Declare the new scope on the DHCP server on windows, exclude the IP address from the scope and configure the server statically.
2) Declare the new scope on the DHCP server, and add a reservation with the Mac address of the IMAP box and then once its activated do a /renew on the xp box to activate the reservation.
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aoakeleyCommented:
You can also just temporarily STOP the DHCP on the router while you run the wizard. Then once the wizard is finished, stop the DHCP on the SBS Server and restart it on the router.
OR
Just plug the SBS Server into a switch on its own (not connected to anything else) when you run the wizard, this will allow it to complete. Then stop the DHCP service and plug back into your network.

Of course it is the "way it is meant to be" and recommended to have the DHCP running off the SBS Server, but you don't HAVE to.

Andy
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flynnyAuthor Commented:
Hi all,

Thanks for your comments.

OK, I've turned the DHCP off on the router (as you menion it should be running off the server).

I then ran the wizard the router being on 192.168.0.1 and the server on 192.168.0.2.

I think I would prefer to register the IP on the server, at least thatr way everything is then contained on the server.

So I would assign the mac address of the old server to the 192.168.0.5 (eventually this will just become a standard machine, but in the interim period I want the transition to this new server to be fluid.)

What do you guys think? are there any benefits to working the other way round you suggested?
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woolnoirCommented:
That should work fine - the only reason for using static server addressing is best practise. The logic is that should your DHCP server have problems your servers will continue to run without problems. If servers are defined dynamically then there is the change that a DHCP failure will effect more than just that server.

If your case go with your plan above, once you have added the reservation do a ipconfig /renew on the mail box and the reservation should show as active in your scope.
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aoakeleyCommented:
I would follow @woolnoir and @rhandels advice to set the DCHP Scope Exclusions so that only IP Addresses higher up in the subnet get allocated from DHCP on the SBS Server and set the IP Address on the other server statically
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aoakeleyCommented:
isn't it nice when we all agree, just in slightly different ways :)
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flynnyAuthor Commented:
ok I see your point then.

Can you tell me how I would change the bounds server ip address range please?

also how do i then set up the static IP on the old machine?

Thanks for all your helps guys ismost appreciated.

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woolnoirCommented:
When you configure the DHCP scope you set the start and ending addresses. At that point you can declare an exclusion for the IP you never want to give out.... OR you can declare a reservation, you could give the reservation the same IP or a different one....

Making a true static address is just a case of going into network prefs on the mail server and changing the IP from obtain from DHCP, to use these values.. and enter the information you want.
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aoakeleyCommented:
> Can you tell me how I would change the bounds server ip address range please?
- use DHCP management console- Scope - address pool - add excluded range

> also how do i then set up the static IP on the old machine?
You do know how to set an IP address on a network card don't you?
Properties of network interface, properties of TCP/IP, set IP Address and make sure SBS Server is the DNS server. detailed instructions http://www.overclock.net/faqs/93129-how-manually-configure-ip-address-step.html
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flynnyAuthor Commented:
Hi Guys,

Thanks for the help and advice.

OK, here what I have done;

I have launched the DHCP management console. In the dropdown selected

<server>.local -> IPv4 -> Scope p192.168.0.0] <server name>.local

and there is already an exclusion of the range 192.168.0.1 - 192.168.0.10. this should be fine should it not?. Now, I am assuming that the router IP (0.1) and server IP (0.2) (as a part of the exclusion) their IPs will be static?

(sorry if i am just stating the obvious, I just wan tto be 100% i've set i up right)
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aoakeleyCommented:
yep. all good. If you want your other server to stay on 0.5 then set its IP Address manually. DHCP Cannot issue an address (even it it is a reservation) into an exclusion range.
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flynnyAuthor Commented:
thanks for all the advice guys. I'll split the points accordingly ;)
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flynnyAuthor Commented:
Thanks for all you quick responses guys. You really put my mind at ease!
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