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Setting up a Print server for Windows 7

Posted on 2010-08-25
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Last Modified: 2013-11-29
I am starting to test Windows 7 in my company.  Initially, it will likely be a mix of x86 and x64 clients, eventually moving to all x64.  I am trying to install printer drivers on my print server which is running 32bit Windows 2003.  However, I can't get the drivers to install.  The drivers are only for Windows 7/Vista/2008 clients.  Do I need to install these drivers on a Windows 2008 x64 server in order for them to work?  Or is there a way to fenagle them to work on a 32bit Windows 2003 server?
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Question by:Tex_ka95
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Kevin Aleshire earned 250 total points
ID: 33522716
The 2003 x86 server wil not give you to options for x64 because it does not run that architecture, you'll need to perform the following steps from an x64 client as a domain admin.

1.Open Print Management from the Administrative Tools folder on the client computer running an x64 version of Windows.
2.Right-click the printer to which you want to add additional printer drivers, and then click Manage Sharing.
3.Click Additional Drivers. The Additional Drivers dialog box appears.

4.Select the check box of the processor architecture for which you want to add drivers. In your instance this would be x64.

5.If the print server does not already have the appropriate printer drivers in its driver store, Windows prompts you for the location of the driver files. Download and extract the appropriate driver files, and then in the dialog box that appears, specify the path to the .inf file of the driver. The driver files you install must match the drivers installed on the print server (the printer name must be identical as well as the driver version).

Hope that helps.
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Expert Comment

by:Pedrotech
ID: 33522735
You need the good old x86 (32bit) XP version of the drivers, to install on the server.
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Author Comment

by:Tex_ka95
ID: 33522810
I use login scripts to setup access to these shared printers.  So I guess my question is....how do I add the x86 and x64 drivers to the driver store on my x86 print server, if that is possible.
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Expert Comment

by:Pedrotech
ID: 33522876
Well after installed and properly shared on the network, on the sharing tab of you printer properties, theres a button to add extra drivers. I believe there is the place to go.
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by:Kevin Aleshire
ID: 33522888
when you say login scripts, are you referring the GPO Preferences??
my assumption is that all of these printers are being shared from the 2003 x86 print server, and your login scripts are connecting each client to the printers.  The steps listed above are for the process of adding the x64 drivers to your 2003 x86 print server.  Once that is done, then the GPO Preferences or login scripts should work just as normally as before.  
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Expert Comment

by:xxndavisxx
ID: 33525651
You can not install 64 bit drivers on a 32 bit computer.  You must have a 64 bit print server to serve both 32 bit and 64 bit clients.
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Assisted Solution

by:graye
graye earned 250 total points
ID: 33555750
Whoa....  yes, you can install 64-bit drivers on a 32-bit computer in this context.   Well, OK "install" is a bit of an overstatement... it's more a pre-staging the drivers.   But you can "load" the 64-bit drivers on the 32-bit server so that the 64-bit clients will automatically detect and install the correct drivers.  Obviously, the 32-bit server won't use those drivers itself... but it will just serve them to the clients
Under the "Printer Properties", there will be "Sharing" tab... and you'll find a button marked "Additional Drivers".   From there you can load your 64-bit drivers
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