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Exchange 2010 - import PST options

Posted on 2010-08-26
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I have read all kinds of info about importing PST to Exchange 2010. I have Exchange 2010 SP1 and I want to import some PST's from an old Exchange 2000 server that have been exported via Exmerge. I have read about PowerShell commandlets, Exchange Manager Tools, etc. to do this but it's not clear to me where these are supposed to be found/installed. For instance:

am I supposed to install PowerShell on the box running Exchange and then run the commandlets from the command line?



am I supposed to install the Exchange Management Tools on the Exchange box?



if I create the mail users on the new Exchange whose PST files I want to import can I simply import them into the 2010 Exchange mailbox via their Outlook?



is there a simple GUI that points to a folder full of PST's and and allows you to point which one goes where in the 2010 and then you push the button and all get moved at once - e.g. like an 'inmerge' as opposed to an Exmerge?

or

do I have to write a script to do that kind of many-to-many import?
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Question by:lineonecorp
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by:wmeerza
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Have a look at the following:

Make sure you take note of the versions being mentioned and what version you have

http://www.howexchangeworks.com/2009/06/export-import-in-exchange-2010.html

also this paq:

http://www.experts-exchange.com/Software/Server_Software/Email_Servers/Exchange/Q_24565181.html
read the whole history
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by:sunnyc7
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am I supposed to install PowerShell on the box running Exchange and then run the commandlets from the command line?
>> Exchange 2010 already has powershell installed.
It's exchange management shell.

am I supposed to install the Exchange Management Tools on the Exchange box?
>> Install where ?

if I create the mail users on the new Exchange whose PST files I want to import can I simply import them into the 2010 Exchange mailbox via their Outlook?
>> You can, but there is a simpler way - explained belwo.

is there a simple GUI that points to a folder full of PST's and and allows you to point which one goes where in the 2010 and then you push the button and all get moved at once - e.g. like an 'inmerge' as opposed to an Exmerge?
or
do I have to write a script to do that kind of many-to-many import?

>> The simplest script is one-line and much better than a GUI

==
situations:
Exmerged PST's
all PST's saved in d:\pst\
pst's named as
mailbox.pst

from Exchange 2010
Open Exchange Management Shell.
Run this

Get-Mailbox –Database <name of database> | Import-Mailbox -PSTFolderPath "d:\PST"

that's it.
http://www.msexchange.org/articles_tutorials/exchange-server-2007/management-administration/exchange-2007-sp1-mailbox-management-part1.html
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by:CorpComp
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How many users are you trying to import for?  If its only a few, I would just stick to what you know and import using Outlook.

The PowerShell way is obviously easier and less painful, but if the concept scares you, stick with Outlook.
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by:lineonecorp
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Fellows,

Thanks for all the alternatives. I have some questions for each  of you per your specific recommendations and also one question for all of you about one alternative that was not addressed.

wmeerza:  

Thanks for the articles - but per the following from the first link "The import/export mailbox in the EMC was only in pre-RTM release. They took it off in RTM.  You need to run the cmdlets in the shell to import/export mailbox." the simple GUI is gone.

The other options described include: Exchange Management Console, commandlets run from the Exchange Server It seems that with that option gone I have 3 left -

+++++++++++++++
direct Outlook import technique:

CorpComp:   -

Does it have to be a special version of Outlook e.g. 64-bit, 2010, etc. or is it a matter of just logging in as the user, going into Outlook 2007  and doing the import from within Outlook e.g. I have  a user useroutlook that is running Outlook 2007 and already has a mailbox - an empty one on Exchange 2010. I log in as the user, open Outlook 2007, choose the import function, find the useroutlook.pst and import it and it will now be part of the Exchange 2010 mail store?

commandlets run from  Exchange Server powershell -
sunny7c:  
Script looks straightforward and from what I understand I am running it on the Exchange 2010 server - is that correct?

Do I need Outlook on that server? special version of Outlook e.g. 2010 64 bit?

Also do I need any Exchange components installed that would not be part of the basic Exchange install or for the  Exchange server to have any special roles above and beyond the standard Exchange default roles? I may have confused terminology here - Exchange Management Tools include Exchange Management Console and Exchange Management Shell and they are part of the default install so that is why you were asking me about where I was going to install the Exchange Management Tools?

I am asking the above because of the following note I found:  "To import data from a .pst file, you must run the Import-Mailbox cmdlet against a computer running Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 that has the 64-bit version of Microsoft Outlook 2010 installed. We recommend that you run the command on a dedicated Exchange server that doesn't have any mailboxes"

So is the above correct? I run the commandlet code you provided me on the Exchange 2010 box but the box needs Outlook 2010 and the mailbox of the user whose PST I am trying to import should not exist - the import will create it?

++++++++
All:

Exchange Management Console -
None of you folks discussed this option - Not recommended for some reason? No experience with?  

As with the other methods, do I  need a version of Outlook 2010 on the server to do this? Outlook 2010 64 bit?  Special roles?



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by:lineonecorp
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One additional note: http://msexchangeteam.com/archive/2010/02/04/453946.aspx - "To start off, you first need to be aware that in Exchange 2010, all management is done via Remote PowerShell, ".  Per this note,  it seems as if I am utilizing remote PowerShell in order to run the commandlets  - does that imply a different server is required? Or just the mechanism of how PowerShell works in this situation and so it's still 'remote' even though it's running from the same server because it's using IIS?
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by:CorpComp
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Hi lineonecorp.

You are correct about the importing of PST files.  You can use any version of Outlook to achieve this, and it is as simple as going to import > pst.

Exchange 2010 is managed by Remote PowerShell, but it doesn't mean that you need to have another server to manage from.  When you manage it locally, it connects back to itself, essentially running the commands remotely, but locally.
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by:wmeerza
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I tend to agree, go with the solution you are comfortable with as there are always a few ways to get the job done. The following gives a simplified and more current instruction on working with exchange 2010.

http://demazter.wordpress.com/2010/03/23/importing-pst-files-in-to-exchange-2010/
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Script looks straightforward and from what I understand I am running it on the Exchange 2010 server - is that correct?
>> yes

Do I need Outlook on that server? special version of Outlook e.g. 2010 64 bit?
Also do I need any Exchange components installed
>>

I'd say, its better if you configure a client workstation with these roles and then run it from there - instead of installing outlook on server.
OR as demazter suggests - fire-up a hyperV or a Vmware and bring up an Exchange 2010 server from there.

You'd need to check these. first

Installation of 64 Bit Windows Operating System (Windows 7 64 bit professional)
Installation of Powershell 2.0
Installation of .NET Framework 3.51
Installation of Outlook Office 2010 64 Bit (which is currently in CTP release available)
Installation of Exchange Server 2010 management tools
Create domain membership for this client
Logon with an administrative account with Exchange’s full administrative permissions

thanks

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by:lineonecorp
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"I'd say, its better if you configure a client workstation with these roles and then run it from there - instead of installing outlook on server.
OR as demazter suggests - fire-up a hyperV or a Vmware and bring up an Exchange 2010 server from there."

Not following this.  The Exchange server is virtualized right now.

Do you want me to create yet another Exchange VM just to install the management tools?

Is the alternative to the above creating a Windows 7 or 2008 VM and installing the tools on it and all the other steps?

Seems like a lot of server/workstation licenses just to manage Exchange - is it really that bad to install them on the existing Exchange VM?

Regardless of the above, wherever I do finally get the Exchange Management Tools installed I'm assuming I can run either the commandlets or use the Exchange Management Console GUI?


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by:CorpComp
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Ok, lets clarify.


You CAN manage Exchange 2010 locally, it just uses remote web services and connects back to itself.  You DON'T need Outlook on this Server, as a matter of fact, it is not recommended.  This is in fact exactly how I do it, as I manage several organisations with a single exchange server each.  Maintaining another copy of Windows & or Server 2008 specifically to manage the exchange server would be a waste of time and money.

Some Exchange administrators (especially the ones that manage several exchange servers) find it much easier to install the exchange management shell components on their local PCs and use that to manage the exchange servers, instead of RDPing to the server, or using WinRM to open a remote powershell prompt.

Just to be clear, to manage Exchange 2010, you DO NOT have to install anything additional onto the server.

Yes, you run either the commandlets or use the exchange management console, doing either results in the same outcome because the management console GUI just executes powershell script when you use it.
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by:sunnyc7
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Is the alternative to the above creating a Windows 7 or 2008 VM and installing the tools on it and all the other steps?
>> Yes

Seems like a lot of server/workstation licenses just to manage Exchange - is it really that bad to install them on the existing Exchange VM?
>> It's not advisable to install outlook on exchange server.

Regardless of the above, wherever I do finally get the Exchange Management Tools installed I'm assuming I can run either the commandlets or use the Exchange Management Console GUI?
>> Preferably Windows 7 with the list above here
http:#33557347
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by:lineonecorp
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Thanks everybody. Lots of good stuff to chew over.
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