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The snapshot manager did not delete the -000002.vmdk file after committing all changes...

Posted on 2010-08-26
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Last Modified: 2013-11-11
I shutdown the VM...  I went to the Snapshot Manager....  I Committed all the changes and there is nothing left...  it Basically says...

VMServer Name
   - You are Here

So, far as I am concerned there shouldn't be any snapshots left...  Please advise...

Thanks!!!
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Question by:Daeta42
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17 Comments
 
LVL 28

Expert Comment

by:bgoering
ID: 33538509
OK, new thread - do a ls -l  in the folder

I would like to see the date/time stamps on the files
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:coolsport00
ID: 33538510
It may take a while to actually delete...give it several moments. If its still there after a while, post back & we can go from there.

~coolsport00
0
 
LVL 42

Expert Comment

by:paulsolov
ID: 33538563
when you browse the VM folder do you see any snapshots?
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Author Comment

by:Daeta42
ID: 33538580
-rw-------    1 root     root        53687091200      Aug 27 01:44            Default- x64 BES-000002-flat.vmdk
-rw-------    1 root     root                541              Aug 27 01:30            Default- x64 BES-000002.vmdk
-rw-r--r--    1 root     root                 13               Aug 26 19:39            Default- x64 BES-aux.xml
-rw-------    1 root     root        53687091200      Aug 24 21:07            Default- x64 BES-flat.vmdk
-rw-------    1 root     root               8684             Aug 27 01:44            Default- x64 BES.nvram
-rw-------    1 root     root                508              Aug 24 21:43            Default- x64 BES.vmdk
-rw-------    1 root     root                853              Aug 26 19:39            Default- x64 BES.vmsd
-rw-------    1 root     root               3159             Aug 27 01:44            Default- x64 BES.vmx
-rw-------    1 root     root               1860             Aug 26 17:49            Default- x64 BES.vmxf
-rw-------    1 root     root             149479           Aug 24 20:17            vmware-4.log
-rw-------    1 root     root             183664           Aug 24 20:19            vmware-5.log
-rw-------    1 root     root             235800           Aug 24 20:19            vmware-6.log
-rw-------    1 root     root             155677           Aug 24 20:19            vmware-7.log
-rw-r--r--    1 root     root             176360           Aug 25 23:53            vmware-8.log
-rw-r--r--    1 root     root             151673           Aug 26 06:35            vmware-9.log
-rw-r--r--    1 root     root             149460           Aug 27 01:44            vmware.log
0
 

Author Comment

by:Daeta42
ID: 33538584
Yeah Cool, I committed the changes yesterday...  Hopefully it doesn't take that long for a plain VM...

0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:coolsport00
ID: 33538586
So, it looks like you don't have a snapshot any longer.

~coolsport00
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:coolsport00
ID: 33538592
Ha...yeah, not at all that long :) Where are you seeing a snap file at?

~coolsport00
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:coolsport00
ID: 33538594
Or wait...your 00002 is a snap, I guess? Try to delete it (commit) using cmd line using this KB:
http://kb.vmware.com/kb/1002310

~coolsport00
0
 
LVL 28

Expert Comment

by:bgoering
ID: 33538668
darn - it looks like the snap is as big as the base disk - that can take forever (seems like) to delete. Follow the kb article that coolsport00 posted and lets see what happens
0
 

Author Comment

by:Daeta42
ID: 33538682
first things first...  I go to the CLI...  go to the path with the default VM...  type "vmware-cmd -l" and it says it can't find "vmware-cmd"....  I can't get past step 1...  sigh...  lol....


0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:coolsport00
ID: 33538691
Oh...do you have ESXi? If so, vmware-cmd isn't in there...it's different; I believe it's vim-cmd? Let me verify...

~coolsport00
0
 

Author Comment

by:Daeta42
ID: 33538710
Closer...  it doesen't understand "-l" though.....


 # vim-cmd -l
Invalid option '-l'
Usage: vim-cmd [options]... command [cmd_arg1] [cmd_arg2] ...
Options:
   -h           Display this help message and exit
   -v           Display version information and exit
   -H <host>    Host name to connect
   -O <port>    Port number to connect
   -U <user>    User name to use for login
   -P <pass>    Password to use for login
   -d <level>   Show verbose debug output. (info, verbose, trivia)

Use the help command to get information on the commands available.

   vim-cmd help [command]
0
 
LVL 28

Expert Comment

by:bgoering
ID: 33538726
At this point I would go back to the client, create a snapshot (so it sees one, the other one is apparently orphaned) and do a delete all again.... Bedtime here will check back tomorrow
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LVL 40

Accepted Solution

by:
coolsport00 earned 250 total points
ID: 33538727
Found a couple articles that should provide what is needed:
http://routingtheworld.wordpress.com/2010/06/01/commit-a-snapshot-from-console-using-esxi-3-x-and-4-x/
and,
http://communities.vmware.com/thread/210801.

First, you need to get the id of the VM; first type:
vim-cmd vmsvc/getallvms
Then, The cmd is: vim-cmd vmsvc/snapshot.removeall [VmId], where "VMid" is the VM ID of the VM that has the snap (I don't think you use brackets for the ID...try it w/out first). Let me know how it goes...

Regards,
~coolsport00
0
 

Author Comment

by:Daeta42
ID: 33538775
Better yet...  I checked the setting of the VM itself...  and it says the disk file is:

 [~Mass Drive] Default - x64 /Default- x64 -000002.vmdk

That's even odder....
0
 
LVL 28

Assisted Solution

by:bgoering
bgoering earned 250 total points
ID: 33541694
Thats how it looks for an orphaned snapshot. The vmx (and vm settings) show the disk as the snapshot vmdk, but you don't see it in snapshot manager. This isn't uncommon, but I still don't have any idea how it gets that way.

At this point what you can try is to create a new snapshot. Your settings and vmx should point to the new snapshot file (probably a -000003.vmdk). It will show up in snapshot manager. From snapshot manager do the "Delete All" function, and (hopefully) it will run a long time - so long that you think nothing is happening - and get rid of all the 00000N files.

Good Luck
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:Daeta42
ID: 33588901
I ended up just re-doing their whole domain...  After seeing things when they came up I was like HFS!!!  Glad you guys got rid of that last IT Manager.  

He created VMs with a 10GB Windows partition and a 50GB data partition.  Exchange has a 12GB OS partition and 75GB for Data...  DNS, WINS, AD, Search, SQL for the BES, and a few other things had failures in the Event logs going back almost a year...  

They always asked him why is the network so slow...  Well I figured that out in about 2 min...  "Spanning Tree"  Somewhere there is a loop in the network...
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