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SBS 2008 - NTFS Permissions too liberal by default

1. The complaint I have seems odd to me but our data drive has default NTFS permissions that allow more access to files and folders that I believe our SBS users should have. We are trying to make sure that only people from the Accounting Security Group can access files inside the Accounting folder but by default, SBS 2008 has applied quite liberal permissions to the root of our drive using the "Users" group, and those permissions are inherited by all subfolders.

I think it's a  simple thing to go into this drive and change these permissions but I'm trying to figure out if Microsoft knows something that I don't about what permissions are likely needed on our shared data drive.

2. There is one more caveat with this "liberal permissions" and I've posted a separate question about that. When a user copies a file or folder into one of these "public shares" they are the owner of the file or folder and it appears I can take ownership of that file or folder but I'm unable to remove the original owner from the permissions. I really don't want the original owner to retain their ownership and custom permissions when they copy a file or folder into a public share. Is there some way to turn this "feature" off?
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HKComputer
Asked:
HKComputer
  • 2
2 Solutions
 
pijiCommented:
1. You can remove the inheritable permission for any directory that you want and then it will ask you "copy" or "Remove". I suggest you do "copy". Then, leave administrator and system permission and remove users and add what ever group you want to have access and the click on replace the permission to child which spread this permission to all the rest of its child.

2. You can change the ownership of folder as well. You can set it up as administrator.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
I would suggest that a GROUP folder does NOT belong int the USERS share.  Create a GROUP share.  What I usually do is something like this:

d:\Users
------joe
------mary
------harry
------jill
------etc
d:\Groups
------Accounting
------Sales
------Support
------Marketing
------etc

In the users folders, permissions are set as:
Full Control to:
---User
---Domain Admins
---System

In the groups folders, permissions are set as:
Full Control to:
---Group
---Domain Admins
---System
Read-Only to:
---IF APPLICABLE, other groups
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HKComputerAuthor Commented:
leew,

1. Do you use the SBS wizard to get this type of granularity? I'm guessing not. It appears that the wizard, in reality, opens the same NTFS permissions dialogue boxes that you get by going straight to the file system.

2. You didn't mention if you use inherited permissions or not and what permissions are set on the drive at the very root. Your solution looks good to me but I would be interested in knowing whether or not you use inheritance and starting/ending at what level.
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HKComputerAuthor Commented:
The solution we settled on is this:

1. At the root of our Data drive we removed all inheritance and set the Administrators group as the owner.
2. We created a data folder and then put departmental folders inside it like Sales, Service, Accounting, Public, etc.
3. In the SBS 2008 console we created groups for our different departments and assigned each user to the correct group(s).
4. All of our departmental folders now have permissions assigned using the groups. Our Administrator account is set as the owner and inheritance for subfolders is enabled.

I think we used a combination of the answers given above but I just wanted to clarify our scheme here in case someone else is trying to figure out a good way to do this.
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