Solved

How do I see Windows 7 Group Policies in Group Policy Management?

Posted on 2010-08-27
2
659 Views
Last Modified: 2012-06-21
Running Small Business Server 2008 Standard. I downloaded "Administrative Templates (ADMX) for Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows 7" and installed it, winding up with a bunch of admx files and language folders in C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Group Policy\win72008r2\PolicyDefinitions. So I copied all the files plus the en-us folder into C:\Windows\PolicyDefinitions.

Net result: zero. I can't see anything in the Group Policy Management tool. All I can find on the web indicates that the Group Policy Management tool is supposed to automatically read all the files in that folder.

In Group Policy Objects I have a Windows SBS Client - Windows Vista policy and a Windows SBS Client - Windows XP policy. How do I get a Windows SBS Client - Windows 7 policy object?
0
Comment
Question by:JonFleming
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
2 Comments
 
LVL 58

Accepted Solution

by:
Cliff Galiher earned 50 total points
ID: 33546144
ADMX files do NOT add new objects. What they do provide are new settings and option in policies that you create. If you edit an existing or create a new policy, you will find new settings under "administrative templates" that are unique to Windows 7, such as controlling DirectAccess, etc. One feature that group policy objects have supported for a long time is that when you view a setting, it will say "supported in Windows 2000 and later" or somesuch. New ADMX files simply add settings that, when you view them, will say "supported in Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, and later." Nothing more, nothing less.
-Cliff
 
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:JonFleming
ID: 33549555
Of  course, what a dummy I am. I should have remembered that.
0

Featured Post

What is SQL Server and how does it work?

The purpose of this paper is to provide you background on SQL Server. It’s your self-study guide for learning fundamentals. It includes both the history of SQL and its technical basics. Concepts and definitions will form the solid foundation of your future DBA expertise.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Active Directory security has been a hot topic of late, and for good reason. With 90% of the world’s organization using this system to manage access to all parts of their IT infrastructure, knowing how to protect against threats and keep vulnerabil…
Auditing domain password hashes is a commonly overlooked but critical requirement to ensuring secure passwords practices are followed. Methods exist to extract hashes directly for a live domain however this article describes a process to extract u…
This tutorial will walk an individual through the process of transferring the five major, necessary Active Directory Roles, commonly referred to as the FSMO roles from a Windows Server 2008 domain controller to a Windows Server 2012 domain controlle…
This Micro Tutorial hows how you can integrate  Mac OSX to a Windows Active Directory Domain. Apple has made it easy to allow users to bind their macs to a windows domain with relative ease. The following video show how to bind OSX Mavericks to …

696 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question