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If Latin1_General_CI_AS same as Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS


In my SQL2000 server, my database is using Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS collation.  Now, I need move/restore this db from SQL2000 to my new SQL2005 64 bit server, however; when I setup this new SQL2005 server, I only found the Latin1_General_CI_AS collation.  Can someone tell me are they the same?  Or, how can I find the Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS in SL2005.

2 Solutions
They are not the same.  The first one (you probably left out "SQL_" is a SQL collation, a hangover from SQL Server 7.0.  From 2000 onwards, SQL Server started offering and using Windows code pages and collations.

See here for some discussion


To use this SQL Server collation (such databases will not work with Reporting/Analysis services)

The option is there on the screen called "Collation Settings" when you install SQL Server. Choose "SQL collations", "Dictionary order, case-insensitive, for use with 1252 Character set.".

it looks like you're using a "SQL" collation on your SQL2000 Server (SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS).  If you want to keep this exact same collation while installing your SQL 2005 Server, you need to select the "SQL Collations" option on the "Collation Settings" installation screen.  And then select the one corresponding to SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS (run "sp_helpsort" on your SQL 2000 Server.  It will show the details on what to use).

But to answer your question: no, these two collations are not identical.  There are slight differences between the two:

1) Latin1_General_CI_AS:  
    Latin1-General, case-insensitive, accent-sensitive, kanatype-insensitive, width-insensitive

2) SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS:
    Latin1-General, case-insensitive, accent-sensitive, kanatype-insensitive, width-insensitive for Unicode Data, SQL Server Sort Order 52 on Code Page 1252 for non-Unicode Data

Hope this helps.
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