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Powershell - Parsing xml file

Posted on 2010-08-27
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Last Modified: 2012-05-10
yes, I am back and hopefully with a quick and easy one.

I have an xml file with about ten lines of info.  One line will be very similar to:
<HostName>computer1</HostName>

The attached code gives me output of:
C:\temp\file.xml:3:  computer1

the c:\temp\file.xml is the source xml file, the 3 is the line number in that file where the string was found .
I only want to see:
computer1

I know this should be easy and I have been searching onlilne for a while and had to give in to tossing out some powershell points :-)

what am I missing here?  is there a better way to do this?

thanks,
C

$objTXTdbserver =New-item -type file "c:\powershell\OutputFiles\computer.txt" -force
$siteXML = "c:\temp\file.xml"
$dbServerA = select-string -path $siteXML -pattern "<HostName>"

$dbServerb = foreach-object {$dbServera -replace "<hostname>", ""} 
$dbServerb = foreach-object {$dbServerb -replace "</hostname>", ""} 

write-host $dbServerb

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Question by:kabaam
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3 Comments
 
LVL 11

Author Comment

by:kabaam
ID: 33548084
I have gone with using foreach to look at each line for
if ($line -match "HostName"?)

then I used the -replace x 2 to rid the tags.

I looks like it will do what I need but is it the cleanest or best practice?

thanks,
C
$siteXML = "c:\temp\File.xml"

$DBX = get-content $siteXML

foreach ($line in $DBX)
   { if ($line -match "<HostName>?")
        {
         $HostName = $line -replace "<hostname>", ""
         $HostName = $HostName -replace "</hostname>", ""
         $HostName = $HostName -replace " ", ""
        }
     }   
        write-host $HostName

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Accepted Solution

by:
Chris Dent earned 250 total points
ID: 33548556

It depends really...

You could do this:

Get-Content $siteXML |
  Where-Object { $_ -Match '<Hostname>' } |
  ForEach-Object { $_ -Replace '<\/?hostname>|\s' }

Or you could read the file as XML, .NET has a lot of XML handling components, so if you want more than Hostname you can do more.

Chris

PS it's early in the morning, I'm hoping it's not too early for me to get the regular expressions above right.
0
 
LVL 11

Author Comment

by:kabaam
ID: 33549739
I guess that is really what I am looking for.  I was up late on my end working on this and searching online for 'powershell parse txt'.  If I did a google search for 'powershell parse xml' I would have found what I am really after. I like the parsing as XML results much better.  I know I will be using more down the line. Now, I need to look into decrypting a file using another application so that the file can be read as xml.

BTW, what you posted above also worked great.  I will save that for an ini file I will need to probe.

http://thepowershellguy.com/blogs/posh/archive/2007/12/30/processing-xml-with-powershell.aspx

Lesson to be learned here: Don't drink and code!
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