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Is there any /proc/mounts(linux) equivilent for Solaris

Posted on 2010-08-30
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I'm trying to modify a simple linux nagios shell script to use on solaris, its relying heavily on "cat /proc/mount" type construct to verify is a NFS filesystems i literally/truly mounted.

is there any Solaris 10x86 equal to this? or some other command that will show me what NFS shares i currently have mounted on my machine?

would be great if i can make this generic enough to run across platforms.

link to nagios script in case you need/want to take a look.
http://exchange.nagios.org/directory/Plugins/System-Metrics/File-System/NFS/check-nfs-mountpoints/details
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Question by:jedblack
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jeremycrussell earned 2000 total points
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you might use /etc/mnttab for this.
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