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Small pdf files getting large when printing

A 3 sides PDF file that is 400kb is when printing reaching 60mb ! - why is this happening?

I have tried to print as picture, but still the same problem
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rossoneris
Asked:
rossoneris
1 Solution
 
JohnARCommented:
Print to a different printer to see if the printer driver is the culprit.  If so you then can choose to upgrade driver, use a different version of same driver or print to different printer.

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rossonerisAuthor Commented:
The same thing actually happend on a different pc with a diffrent printer
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JohnARCommented:
Remember that PDF does a good job on compression, it will store images in compressed format & has to expand upon printing so files often get much bigger at print stage but yours seems excessive.

I have seen wierd issues with individual PDF files over the years.  If it is an isolated issue, then reduce the print quality in printer options or print in B&W etc.



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DansDadUKCommented:
It is not uncommon for a print file to be much larger than the corresponding source document.

... and if you are printing raster images, bear in mind that (without compression);

(a) A one inch square image displayed on a screen, with a typical resolution of 96 dots-per-inch, contains 9216 pixels.
For a monochrome image, (1 bit-per-pixel) that would require 1152 bytes; for a 24-bit colour image, it would require 27648 bytes of storage.

(b) The same image image, on a 600 dpi printer, will (eventually) be described with 360000 pixels.
For a monochrome image, (1 bit-per-pixel) that would require 45000 bytes; for a 24-bit colour image, it would require 1080000 bytes of storage.

Compression techniques are usually used to reduce these requirements somewhat.


As a general rule, when printing a PDF document, it is usually better to use a PostScript printer driver (if your target printer supports PostScript) since PDF and PostScript are very similar in structure (both from Adobe).
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wyliecoyoteukCommented:
As noted above, PDFs are Postscript documents rendered for the screen.
Using a Postscript driver will generate a smaller file, because it is actually a program, not an image, the postscript printer does all of the rendering.
PCl or other PJL printers however, render the images before sending them to the printer.

You might reduce the spooling file size by unticking "enable advanced printing features" in the "advanced" tab of the printer properties, as this toggles windows EMF spooling, which can sometimes generate very large files.
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