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Calling C routine from C++

I am trying to integrate the RSA MD5 hash code, written in C, into my C++ project (Visual C++ 2008 Express).  The project has a separate file with the MD5 code, and compiles fine.  However I get a link error when I try to call it from my C++ code.  The link error is:

error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "void __cdecl MD5Init(struct MD5Context *)" (?MD5Init@@YAXPAUMD5Context@@@Z) referenced in function _com_GetHash

(actually there are 3 routines that fail to link, this is just one)

I assume the problem is related to how I have the routines defined, but nothing I try seems to fix it.  The routine referenced above is defined in the header file (included in both the C and C++ modules) as:

extern void MD5Init(struct MD5Context *);

Any ideas?


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jmckay321
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jmckay321
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1 Solution
 
Anthony2000Commented:
When you want to link in c routines defined in a ".c" file into a c++ program you need to do the following in your header file that you include in your c++ source file. This is because of name mangling. The c++ compiler alters the names of functions (under the covers) and the linker will know how to link these mangled names. So, if you include a header file and don't tell the c++ compiler to use "c" names, then it will default to the name mangling. You can google c++ name mangling and you can find a detailed explanation of what it is.

I copied this from an old Visual C++ program. I think this will work with Visual Studio Express.

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif

extern void MyCFunction(void);

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif


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phoffricCommented:
Try this to let the C++ compiler know that the C linkage is required:
    extern "C" void MD5Init(struct MD5Context *);

You can also try to make the C routine a C++ routine by changing the file extension from .c to .cpp. But then there may be compiler errors/warnings that you may have to deal with. If not too many, that is a good way to go as well (but now you have to thoroughly retest the new .cpp module).
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Anthony2000Commented:
I check the Microsoft docs for predefined macros and __cplusplus is correct.
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Anthony2000Commented:
Here is a good explanation of name mangling in c++:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Name_mangling#Name_mangling_in_C.2B.2B
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phoffricCommented:
>> check the Microsoft docs for predefined macros and __cplusplus is correct
Actually, no need to check, since it is defined in the C++ standard:

16.8 Predefined macro names
_ _cplusplus The name _ _cplusplus is defined to the value 199711L when compiling a C + + translation unit
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phoffricCommented:
So, using __cplusplus is good for any compiler/liner that is compliant to the ISO/IEC 14882 C++ standard.
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jmckay321Author Commented:
Thank you all for your comments - I do recall the issue now, needed a refresher course...
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