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porting faster cable internet into our local 15 PC LAN

Posted on 2010-09-01
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Last Modified: 2012-05-10
At our place of business we have a 15 PC LAN with a connection to our Corp. Office 2000 plus miles away thru our router doing a VPN thru degraded telco copper.  The telco company's DSL connection offers only .5mbps service cause we have poor copper, or the length is to far from the Central Office to provide us with decent internet speed.   We use a proxy server IP address to access the internet.  The proxy server is also 2000 miles away.  Needless to say our internet service is very slow.   At our building we have a fast cable modem just installed.  The cable modem offers 10mbps download speed!


Question is, what is the best way to bring in the high speed internet cable service available to our office and hook it into our 48 port switch so business requests (servers and devices with known & static IPs operating on the company's 12.16.1.xxx subnet) will continue to access the LAN-WAN setup, while any google requests, or typical internet requests go thru the local hi speed cable service we now have available to us?  We currently have a single PC hooked up to the high speed cable, but off the company LAN-WAN.   The cable service is based on a 192.168.1.XXX subnet.

How can we marry up the fast internet cable service into our switch w/o changing any of the current router settings that disperses the company business, or the company data?
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Question by:jayindy1
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by:jorlando66
ID: 33580608
Run the cable modem into the firewall, give the cable modem a local IP address and set the cable modem's local IP as the default route.

Internet traffic will then traverse the cable connection and LAN traffic the existing network.  If you do not have the LAN subnets defined you may need to do so.
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by:jayindy1
ID: 33580868
Jorlando,

The cable modem IP cannot be changed, however I can place a router 1st device behind the cable modem and make the external IP of the router/firebox 192.168.1.2, and the internal/trusted IP can be that of our local business subnet, that of say 12.16.1.250.

You mention firewall, I assume that would be our current business router/firebox/gateway?  It is doing the same thing, taking a DSL IP, (only DSL IP is a static IP like 123.156.157.99 - made up) as external IP, and then our trusted IP is our current 12.16.1.254 Gateway.

Can we then simply plug in the 12.16.1.250 new GW into our switch.  Btw, the cable modem has DNS settings - where do I put those?

Lastly, all our PCs get IPs from our domain controller - another messy device on our network.

I was hoping to make this easy w/o plugging into say WAN2 of our existing firebox/router & doing a reconfig inside it (WAN1/production FB is our existing firebox/router/gateway, it also has a WAN2 port which I assume is where I should plug in the cable modem).



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Expert Comment

by:lejim
ID: 33581019
The best and simpliest way to achieve that is setting up a proxy server on your side of the network, configure it to have your 10mb router as default gateway and configure your computer to use this proxy server either manually or by using GPO if your in windows domain or scripts or whatever you like.

If you don't have server you can set up a proxy using an old computer and a Linux distribution. It will cost you virtualy nothing and a pentium 200 with 32mb ram can easily handle 400 connection at same time.
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by:jayindy1
ID: 33581285
Lejim,

Current IP of the PC hooked up to cable is 192.168.1.2, SNM is 255.255.255.0, and Gateway is 192.168.1.1.  This PC can be the proxy server - cool.  

I assume I'll need to get a 2nd NIC for it and then make its new NIC IP that of our LAN/12.16.1.250, with SNM as 255.255.255.0, and no Gateway, then plug that NIC into our 48 port switch?  I believe this PC (to be the proxy) can only have 1 Gateway, so the GW would be the cable modem/192.168.1.1 & on 2nd NIC I would leave the GW blank on the 2nd NIC?

Then the users Internet Explorer, tools, settings, connection.... would be the 12.16.1.250 proxy IP?

Sometimes the users will have to put in an IP to a corp. server so hopefully that will not be affected, or effected (one of those words), cause the users s/b still able to ping the corp. devices as they always have.

Am I on track so far?
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jorlando66 earned 500 total points
ID: 33581435
You could put a router between the cable modem and your network as you described.  
Give the cable modem an address on your 12.x.x.x subnet and set the 0/0 route as the address you gave the cable modem..Then plug into switch or firewall.

see attached as I had implemented in one of our remote offices.
router-2.JPG
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by:jorlando66
ID: 33581439
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by:jorlando66
ID: 33581453
The proxy server will also work just fine but adds another device to your network. and needs to be firewalled.
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