No Node-Click Event for MS TreeView control V6.0?

In MS Excel this control has a handy Node-Click event, but I can't seem to find this event in the Access version. Does it exist?
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MilewskpAsked:
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Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)Connect With a Mentor Commented:
you may need to repair the Access or reinstall.
to repair, have the Office 2003 available
from Access window
Help > Detect and Repair
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peter57rCommented:
I think you'll find there is one (and lots more events as well). It's the properties box that is the problem, not showing most of them.

In the vba code window you can select the nodeclick event from the dropdown list at the top of the code panel.
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MilewskpAuthor Commented:
Hi Peter,
I tried that already but only the events on the properties sheet appear in the dropdown list at the top of the code panel. Then I tried it just now on another computer, and it shows many more properties (including Node-Click). What would account for the difference?
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peter57rCommented:
32 bit office vs 64 bit office?

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MilewskpAuthor Commented:
Hi Peter,
Both are 32 bit I believe, but it turns out one machine is running Access 2003 SP2 and the other has Access 2003 SP3. Could this account for the difference?
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Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)Commented:
which one is showing less options,  Access 2003 SP3?
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MilewskpAuthor Commented:
Access 2003 SP2 is showing fewer events.
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MilewskpAuthor Commented:
Tried Detect and Repair, no change.
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Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)Commented:
uninstall Office 2003 from control panel > add/remove program
reboot pc
install Office 2003 with options of run everything in computer
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MilewskpAuthor Commented:
Hi cap,
This issue isn't important enough to warrant a reinstall on a PC that otherwise seems to be working OK.

It is correct to assume that if I install Office 2003 from the same CD to 2 different PCs, that I will have the same TreeView control events on both, or does it also depend on how office is configured or what references, extensions are used/ installed? That's probably all I need to know.
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Connect With a Mentor Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
In the majority of cases, the Treeview control is not part of Office, but is rather a VB control. Installing or reinstalling Office (or any part) won't have any effect on these controls, and your currently installed version of Office won't really have any effect on that control. I'd be willing to bet that if you examine the acutal file for the Treeview control, you'll find different versions.

Access 2003 was the last version of access to actually provide and support a treeview control (and then only in the Developer's Edition, which was a separate purchase from all other versions). Many people use the standard VB Treeview, and it definitely exposes a NodeClick event:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa443492(VS.60).aspx
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MilewskpAuthor Commented:
Thanks LSM,
In the link it says:
<To use the TreeView control in your application, you must add the MSCOMCTL.OCX file to the project>
How do you add a file to a project?
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
An .ocx control is an ActiveX control. You insert that using the standard Insert method (i,e, you don't just add a Reference, you add the control to your form, and Access manages the reference for you). And don't forget - while the Treeview is a pretty well behaved control, it is not certified for use in the Access environment, and therefore you may have troubles on different machines.
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MilewskpAuthor Commented:
Hi LSM,
I'm still not clear. Do you mean that all you have to do is copy the MSCOMCTL.OCX file to the user's Microsoft Windows System or System32 directory, and then the treeveiw control will appear in the toolbox's list of ActiveX controls?
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Connect With a Mentor Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
No, you should not do that. OCX files are dependant on several other files, and must have the correct dependant files installed in order for them to run correctly. If you need to install that control on another machine you'll have to do so using standard installation methods. If this is something that is needed for development, then you'll have to install an environment that includes those controls (like VB 6.0, for example) - that's the only way you can get them (and VB 6.0 isn't available any longer).

If you just need "runtime" versions of those controls (i.e. the enduser won't be using them in a design environment) then you can often just use the redistribution installations of those controls. Whether you can legally do so is dependant on what development products you own (Access doesn't provide you distribution rights). There may be downloads available depending on exactly which file is needed.
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MilewskpAuthor Commented:
Thanks LSM.
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MilewskpAuthor Commented:
Thanks all.
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
Just curious - did the repair of Access/Office actually resolve this? I can't imagine it did, since you're issue was with an ActiveX control not involved with Access, but perhaps there was something in the Access install that was bad, and wouldn't show you the proper values?
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MilewskpAuthor Commented:
<Tried Detect and Repair, no change.>
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
Then again I'm curious: Why accept that comment as an answer? I have no issue with it if you feel the comment was important to the question, but the two accepted answers are vastly different (and neither may acutally be correct).
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MilewskpAuthor Commented:
Hi LSM,
Good question. I give points to posts that answer the quesiton or add value.
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