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Advice on Dual booting

Posted on 2010-09-02
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Last Modified: 2016-10-27
Hi,
I've got an Acronis Image of a fresh win 7 installation from the first of the year, that I'd like to be able to boot into, keeping my old win 7 boot still available. And maybe even add a boot up for windows server 2008. Do I need special software?
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Question by:jodyfaison
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by:marine7275
ID: 33589637
Shouldn't need. As long as you have the space on your harddrive and HD controller drivers for 2008, you should be good.
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by:garycase
ID: 33589663
You don't "NEED" special software -- you can use Windows' built-in boot manager to select the bootable OS;  but it is FAR better to use a good 3rd party boot manager that will allow you to completely isolate the OS's from each other;   have every OS on it's own "C:" drive;  and makes it simple to image/restore the OS's as needed.

I use Boot-It NG for this purpose -- a rock-solid little utility that's very reasonably priced ($35) and makes it very easy to install as many OS's as you choose.     It's EMBR structure overcomes the normal 4-partition limit for MBR-based drives;  and it provides complete isolation of the individual OS's.     I have one system with 16 bootable OS's, and my main system (the one I'm using as I write this) has 8 (see my boot menu below).     It's available here -- and you can try it for free:   http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/bootit-next-generation.htm

Note:  It's best to install it before you begin installing your OS's ... but if you already have an OS installed, I would boot to Boot-It, select CANCEL, then OK,  then go to Partition Work;  and select ReSize for your current partition -- then make it a bit smaller so there's room for Boot-It to install to its own partition (it just needs ~ 8MB).    Then reboot and let Boot-It install itself the 2nd time.


My-New-Boot-Menu-with-Win7.jpg
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33589732
Gary,  that software sounds pretty handy, but I was going to restore an image, and then try to boot to that. Would that call for the same instructions?
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by:garycase
ID: 33589735
... one added thought r.e. another advantage of using Boot-It  ==>  to add or delete an OS is about a 30-second process (not counting the install time if you're adding an OS).
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33589755
Oh, and I guess this might be a dumb question. But each app that I want to run under the various dual boots, needs to be installed to that specific os, right? Or is there a trick of some sort to save space, etc?
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by:garycase
ID: 33589764
First, let me be sure I understand exactly what you want to do ...

(a)  You have an existing Windows 7 installation that you want to continue to boot to.

(b)  You also want to boot to a Windows 7 install that you will restore from an image.

Correct?

If so, post a picture of what Disk Management shows for the disk you've got Windows 7 installed on;  then I can tell you how I'd do this.

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by:garycase
ID: 33589801
We're crossing posts here :-)     Yes, you'll need to install each app on each bootable system.
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33589852
Note that Disk 1 was cloned onto the new disk 0, then I removed it. Now I plan to reformat and use it to copy the win7 image to and boot from it, unless you see a better way. But you are correct in your previous message, both a and b.
thanks
DiskManager.PNG
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by:garycase
ID: 33589897
There is no reason to have different disks for the two copies of the OS.    I'd so a bit of restructuring and just put both OS's on the same drive.     The best way to do that depends on a couple of things ...

(a)  How much data is in drive D: ?
(b)  Is D: currently just a clone of F: ?   (i.e. can you delete the D: partition without much hassle?)
(c)  How much data is in drive Z: ?
(d)  Is the image you currently have of the same-size partition as C: ?
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by:garycase
ID: 33589937
... by the way, what is the make/model of your 2TB drive?      If it's one of the low-power drives from WD or Seagate, you may want to keep your OS's on the other drive (Disk 1), as it's most likely a 7200rpm drive and the 2TB drive may be a 5400 or 5900 rpm unit.
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33590023
let see, d: as opposed to f: is actually the more current of the Docville (MyDocs etc) and is much larger as I consolidated a few folders into it.
D now has 1.64 - 1.33 = 500 gigs or so?
D and F were originally cloned yes.
Z has about 15 gigs, I was using it to install program files to save room in the c: partition.
Win 7 Image to be installed is 22. 6 gigs. That's not all used space I don't think.

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by:garycase
ID: 33590068
What are the characteristics of the two drives (0 & 1)?     If Disk 1 is a 7200rpm drive and disk 0 is not, I'd put the OS's on Disk 1.    That's also more convenient, since you can easily free up space on Disk 1 by just deleting the F: partition.     What's in I: ??   ... and how much free space does it have?
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33590071
the 2tb is a Seagate Barracuda. It doesn't have the rpm on the disk as the other disks do.
Disk 1 is 7200.01 as you suspected.
Filemanager.PNG
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33590108
l: was originally the z drive, which was program file installations. Anything on disk 1 can be deleted or re-formatted.
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by:garycase
ID: 33590115
While I'm waiting for your next reply, I'll give you some "get ready" thoughts ...

(a)  Download Boot-It NG
(b)  Extract the files in the download to a folder;  then run the MakeDisk utility and create a bootable CD

To test it, just boot to the CD, select CANCEL at the first prompt (important);  then OK.    You should then see a screen like the following (it won't be exactly like it, since it's not a registered copy) -- just remove the CD and click on reboot (we'll do more in a bit).




Main-Menu.jpg
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33590146
that tb seagate barracuda is a barracuda LP. Whatever that means. I'll search on line and see if can get the specs on that drive.
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by:garycase
ID: 33590184
"... Anything on disk 1 can be deleted or re-formatted. "   ==>  Excellent.    That makes the whole process VERY simple  (although the Boot-It interface is a bit "geeky" ... but not hard)

I would do the following (after you have prepared a Boot-It CD) ...

(1)  Disconnect (just unplug the SATA cables -- obviously do this with power OFF) disks 0 & 2, so the only disk connected is Disk 1.

(2)  Assuming the E: drive is a clone of C:, I presume Disk 1 will boot ==> try that and (important) see if the OS partition is shown as C:     Also, see if your programs work okay (since you put some of those on another partition -- this is NOT, by the way, a good idea, and makes this a much trickier process).

If Disk 1 by itself boots fine, then post a picture of Disk Management as shown by that OS.    If not, we have to take a slightly different approach.
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33590212
here's those specs on the 2TB. I didn't even notice this when buying or installing. Hmm. It might be best for the USB drive that my network router supports.
Seagate-2T-Specs.PNG
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by:garycase
ID: 33590215
No need to search for the specs -- the LP series are 5900 rpm drives -- so I would definitely make Disk 1 your main OS drive.
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33590246
whoops, yes we are really crossing posts. I'll go back and read a few of your posts I missed, i.e. the get ready post.
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33590355
ok, the boot disk completed successfully. I"ll move on to the disconnect process you describe and be back in just a bit. thank you very much by the way...
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33590618
ok, booted up ok. It's a little date, the OS, since its been 2 weeks or so since I cloned.
Disk-Management-2.PNG
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33590699
date = dated
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by:garycase
ID: 33590758
Ok, here's what I'd do:

With just that disk installed (as it is now) ...

(1)  Boot to the Boot-It CD;  select CANCEL at the first prompt;  then OK.     Now click on Partition Work and it will show you the 3 partitions.    Highlight the last one (you can tell by the size -- ~ 35GB);  then click on ReSize.    Make it just a bit smaller than it is now (50MB or so is plenty).

(2)  After that finishes, click on the ReBoot button and boot to the Boot-It CD again.    This time click OK to install (that's where you clicked CANCEL before).     Answer Yes to the "support more than 4 primary partitions" question;  and Yes to the "install Boot-It to its own partition" question;  and "Yes" to the "let Boot-It select the partition" question.      When it's done, remove the CD and reboot -- it should now boot to Boot-It.    It will most likely already have one boot item shown -- if so highlight it and press Enter and you should boot to your current OS.

Let me know when that's done -- and confirm that it boots okay to the OS.


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by:garycase
ID: 33590764
Note:   Once you get that done, if you'd prefer to have the more current version of the OS (from the other disk), we can do that ... but save that process for later.
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33590822
Ok, I may have a problem with the boot disk as when I was making it, it asked whether to install the normal version or the partion work version. I wasn't sure which and can't remember but think I may have the wrong one. Anyway, I'll try it and if I need to make another boot disk will do so and be back.
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by:garycase
ID: 33590878
If it booted directly to Partition Work you made the wrong one.    If you had to click on CANCEL as the first step, you made the right one :-)
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33591383
Yes, looks like I got the right boot disk made, but a few other issues here. I selected yes to create a separate partion for Boot-it, and to let it choose, but an error came back saying it couldn't pick one. So I had the option to do so manually, which I did, and then it said it would copy to there but it didn't seem to as, from ss, that partion is blank and won't let me give it a drive letter. I did format it to the BootIt specs (fat and ??) but now should I boot back up to the cd and try to install it again?
Disk-Management-3.PNG
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by:garycase
ID: 33591475
Okay, did Boot-It install?   (i.e. if you boot the disk do you get the Boot-It menu?)

If so, boot (NOT to the CD);  select Maintenance; then click on Utilities and select Uninstall.    Let it uninstall.

Then (or if it didn't install), do the following ...

Boot to the Boot-It CD; select CANCEL, then OK;  then click on Partition Work.

Highlight the last two volumes (the 4.00GB and 12.10GB ones) and Delete them.    Now highlight the 2nd partition (NOT the contained volumes); and ReSize it -- make it as small as you can (it will show you the min size).

THEN do the installation process again.

The problem is your 2nd and 3rd partitions weren't primary partitions -- they were volumes within an extended partition.    Consequently, when you resized Z: it didn't have any effect on the actual partition ... so there wasn't anywhere for Boot-It to create its own partition.     This is one reason I generally avoid extended partitions :-)


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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33591541
no, I don't think Boot-it installed. When I re-booted the machine after re-sizing the partion, it booted directly into windows.
But ok, I'll boot to CD again and follow those instructions.
Yes, I don't think I like extended partitions anymore either, however they got there. haha
Ok here goes...
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33591756
well, it installed and I've rebooted to the option of win 7 that it offered. But the partioning didn't go smoothly.
When I tried to resize the 2nd partion, it gave me 2 free inside space numbers and 2 free outside space numbers, all zeros, except for the last which was 16500 or so.
I did what I could, but it left me with another partion of 16 gig and then advised that it would not be seen by dos unless I formatted with Fat 32.

Anyway I rebooted then to the CD to try and install Boot it, made all the same choices, it couldn't find a partion, but this time i opted for the shared partion. And it loaded.
That D: drive partion is now 584 with 514 free only 70 gigs used.
dm4.PNG
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33591775
Should I uninstall Boot it, as per your previous instructions? If so, I don't understand the free inside and outside space numbers, or how to shrink that 2nd partion.
thanks
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by:garycase
ID: 33592091
The free inside and outside numbers show how much space is free "inside" the extended partition -- i.e. to use to create more volumes inside the extended partition;  and how much is free "outside" the partition.

Did you create the "TBA2" partition?     If that space was left as unallocated, Boot-It should have installed itself in that area.

I'd do this -- just to be sure you're starting with a "clean slate"  ==>

(a)  Uninstall Boot-It
(b)  Boot to the Boot-It CD, selecting CANCEL, then OK, then Partition Work.
(c)  Delete the last partition (TBA2)
(d)  Post EXACTLY what the Partition Work screen then looks like.     Note:   If you happen to have a floppy, you can capture the screen to a floppy by pressing F12 (unfortunately that's the only way to capture the screen).    If not, just type the details of what it shows in the center of the display.
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33592214
ok, will do
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33592469
Hmm. I just noticed that you wanted the screen after deleting partion TBA2. I took a shot of the screen with the 2nd partion selected in the resize mode. Take a peek and tell me if I should go back and post that initial screen, as it is a bit strange. Actually I will go do that while you look at this shot.
BootIt-SS.jpg
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by:garycase
ID: 33592495
Need the Partition Work display (is that what you're getting now ?)
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33592591
yes, working on it, a few setbacks, but just a second...
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33592673
Ok, whew...
Bootit-Partition.jpg
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33593295
I haven’t been able to make the F12 function work, but the picture I uploaded might be too hard to read, let me translate a bit:

MBR Entry 0 – Partition- 80,584 MB – HPFS/NTFS
MBR Entry 1 – Partition- 618,244 MB –  Extended
   ROAD ? – Volume – 598,249 MB - HPFS/NTFS
   New Volu - Volume – 19,994 MB - HPFS/NTFS
------------ - Partition – 16,575 MB – Free Space
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by:garycase
ID: 33594872
Okay, the free space at the end should be fine for Boot-It to install to.     Boot to the CD, say OK, then answer Yes to the 3 questions (more than 4 partitions;  install to its own partition;  let Boot-It choose)  and see if it now installs okay.

If there's any issue with that, the best thing is to just wipe the disk -- but this is complicated by the fact you've installed your programs on a 2nd partition  (It's a good idea to keep your data separate ... but not your programs).
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by:noxcho
ID: 33594942
I would recommend you using Virtual Machine here if you want to run different software on different machines simultaneously. You need to consider first what exactly do you need.
Do you need chance to select which OS to boot during restart or do you need to run one OS in another one (so actually 2OSes in one instance).
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33597285
Hello Gentlemen,
noxcho: Yes I would really like the option of doing both, the dual boot menu and a virtual machine, to have one machine in the other.  Last time I tried to load MS Virtual Machine, it wasn't supported in Windows 7. Did I do something wrong, or is there another software option?

gary: I'm away from my home PC all day today but will proceed with instructions when I return home. Do I need to try and reduce the size of that 2nd partition?
As to wiping the disk, that was my original intent as the current OS and Program files I'd like to keep are on the 2TB drive.
By the way, I won't separate the OS from the Program files again. I had just not allocated enough partition for the OS and all the programs I like to load (and Visual Studio and SQL etc are huge!).
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by:noxcho
ID: 33598210
MS Virtual machine is definitely supported by Windows 7 Professional and higher versions. Seems your was not fitting to it or your chipset does not support hardware virtualization.
Have a look then on Sun VirtualBox. It is absolutely free virtual machine: http://www.virtualbox.org/
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33598492
ok thanks noxcho, will do.
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33603570
Hello:
gary, if you're there, I've rebooted to Boot It and this time it installed no problem. Now I'm not sure how to get back to orginal plan, i.e. getting newer OS back to the 7200 rpm disk (the one that now has boot it installed), add the 22 gig win 7 image to Boot It, etc.
Dsk-Man-SS.PNG
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by:noxcho
ID: 33603722
Actually Boot Manager must pickup your second OS automatically. At least another boot manager by Paragon does it. You install it once and since then if you connect another HDD with OS on it you get in menu two OSes.
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33603825
hmm, that's what I was thinking. I attached my first hd with the current OS on it, thinking it might see it. But it only saw one Win 7 os when it booted into its start menu. I assume that was the OS on the same disk where Boot It installed itself.
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33603837
Hmm, to clarify my last posting a bit, if possible - both disk 0 and disk 1 (each with an active installation of Win7 OS) were visible in the bios before continuing the boot up.
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by:garycase
ID: 33604179
I've been working outside this morning - and will be for a couple more hours.    I'll post a detailed set of instructions on how to continue in 2-3 hours ... and should be here all evening to continue the dialogue.
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33604259
thk gary, I hope your weather is a great as it is here in Nashville today.
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by:garycase
ID: 33604647
Well it's now up to 88 so I'm going to hibernate for the rest of the day.    Got a few "honey do's" to deal with, but I'll post a quick note to get you started, then add more as you need it.

IMPORTANT NOTE:   From now on, do NOT do any partition modifications from Windows -- the ONLY thing you should do from within Windows Disk Management is modify your drive letters.     Since Boot-It maintains an EMBR structure, Windows will "see" areas that are currently being hidden from any particular boot item as unallocated space -- and if you do anything that modifies that you'll destroy your other boot items.

A few notes on the next things to do ...

(a)  You now have the 7200rpm disk set up to do everything you need, so you're in pretty good shape.   The next few steps are notably complicated by the dual-partition structure of your OS (with the program files on a 2nd partition) ... and may require some "tweaking" later.

(b)  First, let's get the more up-to-date OS on this drive.     To do that, shut down;  connect the other drive;  then boot (you may need to reset the boot order in the BIOS to be sure it boots to the 7200rpm drive);   and then go to Maintenance mode in Boot-It and click on Partition Work.     You should now see two drives (HD0 and HD1).    Be sure you know which is which (the size should make that obvious).

(c)  Select the drive with the newer version of the OS, highlight the OS partition, and click on Copy.    You'll now see a message at the bottom of the screen that says "Paste Pending for Copy"  ==>  select the other disk; highlight the partition where you want this to be (the OS partition); and click on Paste.    Wait for this to finish.

(d)  The next step is complicated by the different sizes of the two "Z:" drives, but this should work:    Select the 7200 rpm drive and highlight each of the volumes in the 2nd partition and click Delete for each;  then select the 2nd partition and click Delete for it.    That drive should now have the OS partition;  the Boot-It partition; and a bunch of unallocated space.       Now select the larger drive, highlight the volume that represents Z:, and click Copy.    Now select the 7200rpm drive, highlight the unallocated space, and click Paste.      I BELIEVE Boot-It will do this copy and simply make it a primary partition (this is what we want).     If not, there's another way ... but let's see if this works okay first.

When you are done with these steps, turn off the computer;  disconnect the large drive;  and then reboot.    It should boot fine to Windows -- but you'll probably have to reassign the drive letter for the 2nd partition as Z: for your programs to work right ==> do that FIRST, before you try any programs.

It would be VERY helpful for me to see exactly what the Partition Work screen shows at this point - so type the details out in your next post.

Let me know when that's all done ... I'll probably be back by then.
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by:garycase
ID: 33604685
... one other note:   When you first boot to Windows, it will "detect new hardware" and require a reboot.   This is normal ... it simply "sees" the modified partition structure of the disk and thinks its a new hard disk.
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33604697
"That drive should now have the OS partition;  the Boot-It partition; and a bunch of unallocated space. "

Hey gary, just about to get started but shouldn't this 7200 drive show, after I copy the current os to it, the current os partition, the old os partition, the boot it partition,  and the Z. (and maybe the volumes? but I might be confused now)?
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by:garycase
ID: 33604726
No ==>

(a)  You're going to overwrite the old OS partition with the newer one  (When you select the destination for the Paste, highlight the OS partition)

(b)  You're going to delete the two volumes within the extended partition and then the extended partition on the 7200 rpm drive  ==> then you're going to copy the volume that represents Z: from the larger drive.

Print out what I posted above and follow it VERY carefully.    If you have any questions, just post a note here.      As I noted earlier, this is significantly complicated by the dual-partition nature of your OS, but once you get it set up it will be VERY simple.
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33604743
Ok got it, and yes it's printed, but just wasn't sure if I was to copy over that old OS.
Ok, here goes...
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33604827
Problems: when i copied the current os, i got the 'copy pending to paste' to message, but when i went to the 72pp rpm drive the option to paste was grayed out. To test it, i selected all partions and the 3 disk i had attached, none would allow a paste. i tried then to get an impage of the current os,  which i did and got the paste pending message, and then went to the 72 rpm drive and the paste button was available. So i tried it and the largest it would allow was 4 gig, and asked me for a name.

I"m on my laptop now and it's still pasting the image (about 35% complete). should I cancel it or will it be useful to have?
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by:garycase
ID: 33604860
It's not at all clear to me what you just said :-)

Did you highlight the OS partition on the 7200 rpm drive?    (Click once on it so it was clearly selected)
That should have then allowed you to paste.

What exactly did you do after that?      If I understand what you did, you (a) selected the 2TB drive;  (b)  highlighted the OS partition;  (c) clicked on Image;   (d)  chose the OS partition on the 7200 rpm drive;  and (e)  selected Paste for the image.      Is that right?

... if so, what you just did was saved an image of the newer OS on the OS partition of the 7200 rpm drive.   That's OK -- as long as it fits.      Let it finish ... then post a note back and I'll tell you how to recover from this :-)

... actually, you can go ahead and do that next step after it finishes ==>  When it's done (assuming it finishes okay ... if there's not room for the image it will fail), do the following:

(a)  Shut off the computer
(b)  Disconnect the 2TB drive
(c)  Boot.    The image you just made will be on the C: drive (probably the root unless you selected a folder).     Copy that image to the data partition (D:).
(d)  Reboot and go to Maintenance mode, then Partition Work.
(e)  Highlight the data volume (the first volume within the extended partition)
(f)  Click on Image; select Restore Image;  and then highlight the image file you just copied.    You should now get the "Paste Pending" message
(g)  Highlight the first (OS) partition ... then click on Paste.     When this finishes you've done the same effective thing as the copy would have done.

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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33604896
weIl i selected the os partition on the 72rpm drive with the keyboard, as the mouse usb drivers are not loading in partion work (they work in the main maintenance home screen). But anyway i think it was well selected or the image would not have pasted.
Anyway all i'm saying is the paste button is grayed out in all circumstances. though the partion is copied.
-------
now yes the image copy failed due to lack of space. I repasted it to the extended partition where it is now pasting.

i'm a bit worried that it may fail also as once again when saving the image file the largest option it gave me was for a 4 gig file.

if it copies successfully, i'll follow the above instuctions. i'll also look for a non usb mouse.
thanks for your patience,!!!!!
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by:noxcho
ID: 33604915
jodyfaison, have a look on this article just for interest: http://www.experts-exchange.com/OS/Miscellaneous/A_685-Multiboot-system-configuration-from-scratch.html
You can omit all the steps and just copy the existing OS or connect second HDD, boot any of the OS and install Boot Manager. Since then it must pickup both OSes.
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33604927
oh ok thanks noxcho, opening that link now.
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by:jodyfaison
ID: 33605082
well, the image copied to the 72rpd disk successfully so say BootIt - NG. But...
I seems to have wiped out all the info or partiotions on the 72rpd drive? Note SS.
I'm going to try to boot into the 72 rpd drive now and see what happens. I'm booted into windows now from the current Os on the 2tb disk.
dsk-man-3.PNG
0
 

Author Comment

by:jodyfaison
ID: 33605110
Well the drive is fine regaurdless of what Drive Manager says...because I've just booted onto it.
It looks like BootIt NG broke the image into 7 4 gig files, note the SS.

Current-OS.PNG
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Author Comment

by:jodyfaison
ID: 33605154
Ok, gary, well I'm looking back at your message - 05:14 PM, ID: 33604860 - and the a, b, and c etc, parts of paragraph 3, and the answer is yes, that's what I did.
Now I've got this split image and if I could put it back together i think I could procede.
Any thoughts on how to procede with reconstrucking it?
I have winRar,Deamon Pro, Acronis, Nero Burning Rom, all loaded.

noxcho, I'm reading through the post you gave me the link to.
 
72-rpm.PNG
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LVL 70

Expert Comment

by:garycase
ID: 33605195
You don't have to reconstruct the image ==> the file sizes you choose with Boot-It when you create an image are simply what size it breaks the image into --- it will restore just fine with no effort on your part.

The drive looked different from the other OS because of Boot-It's EMBR structure -- remember what I said earlier ... do NOT do ANYTHING to the drives from within Windows Disk Management except assign drive letters.

It's fairly common for a USB mouse to not work within Boot-It ... although in most cases you can fix that by enabling USB mouse support in the BIOS -- check your BIOS for that option. If not, the keyboard works fine ... you just have to be careful that you're selecting the right things.

You should now be able to select the image you just saved and restore the OS from that ... steps (e), (f), and (g) from my last post. Be sure you highlight the image file you created in step (f) ... you should then get the "Paste Pending ..." message, and you can then highlight the OS partition and Paste it.
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Expert Comment

by:garycase
ID: 33605201
By the way ... does this system have a floppy drive?

If so, you can put a floppy in the drive, and press F12 to capture any Boot-It screen.    This would be VERY convenient.     It saves the capture as a .PCX file, which is not an allowed file on EE.    But you can easily change it to a .JPEG with the free Irfanview -- if you don't have this, it's a VERY handy utility  [http://www.irfanview.com/ ]

Meanwhile, get the image restored and confirm the system boots okay and we'll continue from there.
0
 

Author Comment

by:jodyfaison
ID: 33605223
I can re-enable my floppy, though when it was working I couldn't get the F12 feature to work. I'll try again though.
0
 
LVL 70

Expert Comment

by:garycase
ID: 33605225
This is basically how your screen should look after you select the image file (except you only have one disk installed right now).

Note the size shown next to the "Paste Pending ..." message.    That size should match the size of the OS partition you want to restore to.     They appeared to be identical in your earlier Disk Management screen shot, but if there's ANY difference you may not be able to paste the image without a bit more manipulation.

Let me know if that's an issue.

[Note that I captured this -- and all of my Boot-It screens -- with F12]


Paste-for-Restore.jpg
0
 

Author Comment

by:jodyfaison
ID: 33605597
wow, sorry for the delay. I got the image pasted over to the OS partition of the 72rpm drive. It took a while to reconstruct there, but seemed to fit, finally.
I deleted the 2 misc. volumes and then the 2nd partition of the 72drive and I also got the Z drive moved over,  I shut down then. Removed the 2tb disk.
I tried to get the a: drive back in action but it seems to have problems reading the disks. I'll work on that.
then rebooted into boot it and on into windows.
After signing in, it started created a new desktop, it said, but ultimately never opened. The only image on the the blank blue wallpaper said that the Windows 7 version was not genuine. It is genuine though.
I worked with that awhile to no avail.
One another front, I noticed a little bit earlier that my acronis disk monitor was starting to give me errors and warnings about the 72 disk. I've got some screen shots of those if you want to see.
So I started looking more closely at my 1500 gig disk, that is also 7200 rpm.

Boot it said it had a disk error 72 (I think) and to run chkdsk /f .
Now I'm left with the original 2tb drive, working fine. But everything else a mess.

I tried to install boot it on the 2tb disk for the time being but could never get the hang of creating a partition. I could create volumes but not partitions. Boot it would never install automatically or manually in any of the 32 fat volumes I created or the free space.
Whew. I think I'm calling it a night. I'll check back tomorrow for any thoughts you may have.
sorry to be so difficult.
0
 

Author Comment

by:jodyfaison
ID: 33605600

Correction: I copied the z drive over, not moved it over, per line 4.
0
 
LVL 70

Expert Comment

by:garycase
ID: 33605761
Not completely clear on just what you did ... but the key is whether or not the 7200 rpm drive you're using is still okay (which may be questionable).

If you connect JUST the 7200 rpm drive, does it boot okay to the Boot-It screen?

If so, what does the Boot Item look like for the Windows 7 OS?    The screen looks like the following -- describe EXACTLY what partition structure is shown on the right side (where this example shows HD 0 with XPw2003 in the first item and the rest blank;  HD 1 with MBR Entry 0 in the first entry and the rest blank, and HD 2 with MBR Entry 0 in the first item, MBR Entry 1 in the second item, and the other two blank).

In addition, describe EXACTLY what is shown on the Partition Work screen for the drive.


Boot-Edit.jpg
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Author Comment

by:jodyfaison
ID: 33607248
I worked hard to get that floppy drive working, but to no avail so far. I'll try now in the daylight and with some new disks maybe.

Anyway...I booted into Boot It to try and get some of the info you request in your last posting.

The OS on the 72 rpm drive is no longer appearing on the boot menu, which I assume is the source of the above Screen Shot.
Actually Boot It is no longer booting when the 72 rpm disk is attached (the 72 750 gig disk is where Boot It originally installed) .

I'm sure you must be confused as I am confused, about what I tried late last night, after your last post.

Anyway, I think the floppy is somewhat essential to this process and I will work more on that. I've got to finish up some school work today. So my reports may be intermittent.

thanks for hanging with me...
0
 
LVL 46

Assisted Solution

by:noxcho
noxcho earned 75 total points
ID: 33607330
When you get tired with it give a try to BM I described in article =)
0
 

Author Comment

by:jodyfaison
ID: 33607413
I hear you noxcho, my pc ocd might be kicking in.... haha
0
 
LVL 70

Expert Comment

by:garycase
ID: 33607776
Not available much today -- but at this point I'd wipe the 750GB drive;  reinstall Boot-It;  create a 100GB partition (NTFS);  set a boot item called "Windows 7";  and then install a fresh copy of Windows 7 to that partition.     Assuming you have the Windows 7 install DVD -- and that it was previously installed on this system (so it will activate fine) -- this would eliminate the "dual partition" OS structure;  and will make it VERY simple to get Boot-It managing your multiple OS's.

Note that once it's installed like this, it's TRIVIAL to create a 2nd copy to "play with"  (and a 3rd, 4th, etc.)

It's also very simple to add other OS's if you should need/want to.

The Paragon boot manager noxcho suggested will also work fine if you only want a simple dual boot setup;  but doesn't have the complete isolation that Boot-It does between OS's ... and isn't nearly as good if you want more than two OS's on your boot menu.

Finally, Virtual machines are also a good way to try various OS's -- I have over 35 virtual machines handy :-)      You just need to decide which way you want to structure your system.     ... as you can tell, I'm a big fan of Boot-It because of the total isolation it provides between OS's.    As I noted earlier, its interface is a bit "geeky" ... but once you understand and use it you'll never use anything else.
0
 

Author Comment

by:jodyfaison
ID: 33607889
Ok thank you gary, I do have the win 7 dvd.
0
 
LVL 70

Accepted Solution

by:
garycase earned 425 total points
ID: 33608028
If you install just the 750GB drive and boot, I understand Boot-It is (somehow) no longer installed -- is that correct?

If so, just boot to the Boot-It CD; select CANCEL, then OK; then go to Partition Work; and delete ALL of the current partitions. Now reboot to the CD and let Boot-It install -- select OK, then answer Yes to the 3 questions. When that's done, remove the CD and boot again -- you should now be at the Boot-It menu. Go to Maintenance; then Partition Work; then create a partition for Windows 7 (I'd make it 100GB, but if you want it a bit larger, just use 150GB). Just click Create, then enter the size, then the file system type (NTFS).        Name it Win7. Now go to the Boot Edit screen; create a new boot item; name it Windows 7, and set the bootable partition as Win7. Now exit Boot Edit; click Resume; highlight the Windows 7 boot item (it will probably already be highlighted); and click on Boot.

At that point put in the Windows 7 DVD and press Ctrl-Alt-Del ... then proceed to install Windows 7 ==> being sure to choose the 100GB (or 150GB) partition you just created as the destination for the install. When it's done, and you're at the Windows 7 desktop, you'll need to reboot with the Boot-It CD ... when it boots you'll get a "Re-Activate Boot-It" choice -- select that; then remove the Boot-It CD; and your system will now boot nicely to the Boot-It menu and Windows 7.

When you get to this point, it is VERY simple to add additional boot items; control which partitions each OS "sees"; image the OS; restore from an image; etc.

If you have any questions on this process, just ask.
0
 

Author Comment

by:jodyfaison
ID: 33639791
hmm, don't know why my last post from last night didn't post...
Anyway I was saying. I been a bit busy with school and my daughter is sick, but I am going to do the stuff as advised in the last post by gary.
And gary you are correct in the that first question, first sentence....
thank you so much.
I think I can take from here. If I have questions I'll re-post I guess.
0
 

Author Comment

by:jodyfaison
ID: 33639817
good that posted, almost didn't, hmm.
anyway I think I"ll hang out till later in case there are anymore comments, then close out points, etc later tonight.
thank you gary and noxcho. I'll be using both or your comments and instructions now and in the future I'm sure.
0
 

Author Comment

by:jodyfaison
ID: 33654186
all right, go it done last night, worked great.
thanks for all the heavy lifting gary
noxcho, though I followed through with gary's plan I do appreciate you input esp. with the virtual boxes.
wish I had more points to offer.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:jodyfaison
ID: 33654220
thanks guys, esp gary, wish I had more points to give as this was a bit of process.... I love the boot it ng program, btw
0
 
LVL 70

Expert Comment

by:garycase
ID: 33654301
Glad you got it working.    As I noted earlier, once you get used to Boot-It, you'll never use anything else for multi-boot systems.

It's SO easy to set up as many OS's as you want -- or multiple copies of the same OS  [The simplest way to do the latter is to install everything you want to be common among all copies;  image it;  then restore the image to another partition -- then you can boot to two (or more) copies of the same OS, and "tweak" each copy as you like].

Virtual machines are also handy -- I also have several dozen of them :-)

0
 

Author Comment

by:jodyfaison
ID: 33654534
oh ok, nice tip thanks
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