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Can't login to Windows2000 domain with Windows7

Posted on 2010-09-07
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Last Modified: 2013-12-05
I've got a Windows 2000 Server domain with some WindowsXP-Pro computers.  All working fine.
I have a new Windows7-Pro computer and was able to name the computer and join the domain.

I can login to the PC as domain administrator (using "DOMAIN\user" syntax) and that works just fine. But if I try to log into the new computer as a domain user, I get the following:

The trust relationship between this workstation and the primary domain failed.

When I go to the Control Panel and try to add the user as an administrator to the computer, I get:

The user could not be added because the following error has occurred:
The trust relationship between this workstation and the primary domain failed.
 

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Question by:markgoodall
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Expert Comment

by:FunkyBrown
ID: 33619881
I would suggest you remove this computer from the domain, delete the Computer from active directory, and re-add the machine. Are all your DNS settings in check?
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Author Comment

by:markgoodall
ID: 33619941
I've tried un-joining from the domain (going back to a workgroup) and the re-joining the domain, but it hasn't helped.

It says that the Windows7-Pro computer is part of the domain, and I can log in as the domain admin, but I just can't log in as a domain user.
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Expert Comment

by:FunkyBrown
ID: 33620077
When you go back to a workgroup, did you make sure the computer account is no longer in active directory? Are you still getting the error message:

The user could not be added because the following error has occurred:
The trust relationship between this workstation and the primary domain failed.  

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Author Comment

by:markgoodall
ID: 33620176
Thanks, I tried that.  Even tried using new computer names.  Doesn't solve it.
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Author Comment

by:markgoodall
ID: 33620199
DNS looks fine.  I can join the domain effortlessly, just can't login as a domain user, only domain admin.
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Accepted Solution

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DedPoet earned 500 total points
ID: 33620285
I had a similar issue in that a Windows 7 computer could not access Windows 2000 shares.  Making some changes to the Local Security Policy helped:
http://www.tannerwilliamson.com/2009/09/windows-7-seven-network-file-sharing-fix-samba-smb/
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Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 33620664
What happens if you turn off UAC temporarily?  Does that affect the user's ability to log on?

... Thinkpads_User
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Expert Comment

by:thetime
ID: 33625552
Sounds like the Local security Policy to me as well, check the link DedPoet posted. Looks like it should do the trick.
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Expert Comment

by:Tolomir
ID: 33999634
This question has been classified as abandoned and is being closed as part of the Cleanup Program.  See my comment at the end of the question for more details.
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