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checking if object exists in python

I'm calling a method for which i don't know if it returns something (eg:ObjectX) or nothing (eg:null) so I'd like to check if object exists like in java:
ObjectX o = tryGetObjectX()
if (o==null) {
   ...
}
How do I do this in Python?
0
infokrt
Asked:
infokrt
  • 2
1 Solution
 
-Richard-Commented:
You almost have it.  In Python the keyword which signifiies nonexistence is "None".  In Python, all methods return a value, and if the method is not written to explicitly return a value,then its return value is "None".  Thus your code snippet would look like this:

    o = tryGetObject()
    if o == None:
        ...

Note that in Python the type of a variable is determined by what is assigned to it, not by any explicit declaration, s it is not necessary to declare "o" as an "Object" or anything else.
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w00teCommented:
In addition to Richard's answer, you may want to read this.  It's just some good examples about using none, empty, and nothing and how they compare to coming from a C background (fairly similar views to Java).  Anyway, it's an easy read and may give you some new perspective on the differences between python & its scripting style vs compiled languages :)
http://boodebr.org/main/python/tourist/none-empty-nothing
-w00te
0
 
peprCommented:
It is better and also more readable to use the operator 'is' or 'is not' instead of '==' or '!='.  It compares for identity of objects instead for their value equivalence.  The None is actually singleton object in Python.  The None is the named reference to that object.  You should prefer to return None in your tryGetObject() even though you could return anything that you can detect.

You can also think abou the built-in function isinstance() (see http://docs.python.org/library/functions.html#isinstance) and modify the behaviour according to the class of the returned object.
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peprCommented:
In adition to what Richard wrote.  In Python, any variable is actually named reference.  The name is never bound to the object, always to the reference to the object.  The reference is always untyped.  The type is always bound to the target object.  Because of this it seems that variable can change its type.  Actually, variable always contains untyped reference and does not care what type of object is referenced.

Warning: When assigning a variable you always copy only the reference.   The target object is shared (references are counted).  When you need to copy the object, you have do do it somehow more explicitly.  
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