SQL 2005 How do you create a Index Over a View

I can create a View in SQL 2005 by Choosing Views and then create a view.
Now if I want to create a index over that view where do I do that ?
Within my stored procedure ?
I don't want to recreate my view index everytime that stored procedure is called ?
And where is that view index stored in SQL 2005 ?
Looks like creating a index over a view is not as simplified as creating a index over a table.
thayduckProgrammer AnalystAsked:
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David Christal CISSPConnect With a Mentor Commented:
You are correct, indexed views are not as simple as indexed tables.  Here is an article describing the ins and outs of creating indexes on views.  

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc917715.aspx#XSLTsection124121120120

Generally, they are not needed if the related tables are well indexed.  Per the article: "Frequently occurring aggregations and joins are the best candidates for indexed views."
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MarblemanCommented:
As the name "view" states, your are just "viewing" data with it and not storing this selection somewhere.

Therefor you cannot add an index to a a view. I cannot think of a situation that would make this necessary...

However you could do something like that with "SELECT INTO newTable..." but this duplicates the data.
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thayduckProgrammer AnalystAuthor Commented:
This IBM site talks about Indexed Views. Thats what got me thinking.

 http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc917715.aspx
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mustaccioCommented:
There are some limitations as to what views can be indexed, but generally you indeed can create indexes over views. That essentially materializes the view results.

You create an index for a view with a regular CREATE VIEW statement. The first index must be unique and clustered.

You will find more details here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc917715.aspx
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thayduckProgrammer AnalystAuthor Commented:
Sorry dchristal, sent answer before I read your response.
We saw same thing.

I have created 3 indexes over the table that I then created a view over.

I created the view because there are approx 8 flds in the table that could contain a $ amt and if they do then I include record into the report. If all flds are 0 then I ignore the record. I thought it would be better to create a view and only include records that have a $ amt in 1 of these 8 flds. But after I did that I realized I probably lost my index's  since they are over the table and not the view. Thats what made me curious about View Index's..

Will probably re think and put a better Where clause in my query.. and forget about the View..
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DBAduck - Ben MillerConnect With a Mentor Principal ConsultantCommented:
When you use a View you don't lose the indexes.  A view is meta-data and still knows about the views.  The only time you lose the power of indexes is if you use a (SELECT query) inside a select query, which creates a Virtual Table.  Then you lose the indexes.

So you should not forget about the view, it should be just fine to use it.  But you could materialize the view with SCHEMABINDING to make it into a psuedo table and only have those columns in the table.  Sometimes this is useful when you have a lot of columns in the table and you don't want to scan or go after the base table.
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8080_DiverConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Something to bear in mind, though, is that an Indexed View is, indeed, instantiated and changes to the underlying table will result in the recreation of that view.  If you have a lot of INSERTS, UPDATES, or DELETES impacting the underlying table, you can be adding a good bit more load on the database because each of them will trigger the INDEXED VIEW rebuild.
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