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Building a dual network. Where do I start?

Posted on 2010-09-10
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I'd love to be able to seperate the workload between two networks, one being a network inside of a domain entrusted with movement/editing of files on the primary server, as well as always keeping connection alive to our domain controller whether for authentication purposes or whatever the need might be, like accessing a computer on a local network via remote connection. this should also increase security but then thats in theory.

the other network would be the one providing gateway to the internet.

What kind of hardware/software am I looking at?
Does each workstation need to have 2 ethernet cards and 2 cables connected?
Or can a dual network exist withing the same cable

Like i mentioned in my title, i dunno where to begin with this. It might not even be the best idea for our company (1 DC/3 servers total, 15 workstations). Where do I start? What could be the cost?
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Question by:Anti-Mhz
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Tordan earned 250 total points
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in my not so humble opinion, you will not be able to create enough performance benifit to justify the work and the cost of using two seperate networks. You would be better off simply using quality equipment.

if you use Gigibit ethernet it is extreamly unlikely that your LAN will be anypart of a bottleneck for internet traffic, and because internet traffic can only use a limited about of your internal bandwith it will not really make a difference on LAN traffic.

If you use good quality Gigibit Switches then the traffic flowing from a workstation to the internet ALREADY doesn't touch your server, and vice versa (this is the difference between a SWITCH and a HUB)

I would spend your time and money on new good quality switches and cat 6 wireing instead.
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by:Tordan
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errrrr typing too fast again   ... use a limited AMOUNT of your ...
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by:maxpower669
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I would agree with Tordan.

I dont suggest a seperate network will be the best solution for you.  With 3 servers & 15 workstations, you shoudl have plenty of bandwidth not to bottleneck if a user is transferring files.  

I work as a IT Consultant and the last setup of a network I did had over 150 users all using the same network and with VoIP and no problems with speed.

I would suggest to use good quality switches,  it may be that you are only using an old hub which has 100mbps shared across the unit rather then 10/100 per port. You can buy good Linksys or HP procurve switches these days for around $1000 AUST.

You could also invest in a unit which uses QoS but I doubt you would need that.
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by:Anti-Mhz
ID: 33652055
would 10/100 per port be an auto setting. im going try and pull hub's details
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by:Tordan
ID: 33652074
The difference between a hub and a switch is that a hub sends ALL traffic to all ports and lets the NIC cards in each machine decide to answer or not, while a switch 'learns' the IP address(s) at each port and only routes the traffice to the port that feeds those addresses.
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