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MS Access 2010 : missing or broken reference to the file 'asctrls.ocx' version 1.0

Posted on 2010-09-10
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Last Modified: 2012-05-10
I am running access 2007 on a xp. I tried to share the database file with windows 7 pc running 64 bit on my network. I created a share folder on xp and tried to access on win 7 pc, but I got the following pop up message : missing or broken reference to the file 'asctrls.ocx' version 1.0

Eventually I can open my database, but it seems I am not able to save it and if I open first on win 7 pc and then on xp I will not be able to open it. 1 2
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Question by:okamon
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9 Comments
 
LVL 75
ID: 33652107
Well, you are going to need to fix the reference.  Do you know how to do that?

mx
0
 
LVL 18

Expert Comment

by:Jerry Miller
ID: 33652123
Click on the Database tools tab and open the VBA editor. Then choose Tools>References. Click on the 'asctrls.ocx'  reference. It should be marked as Missing. Then click browse and find it on your computer.
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LVL 18

Expert Comment

by:Jerry Miller
ID: 33652128
On XP, it is located @ C:\WINNT\system32
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Author Comment

by:okamon
ID: 33653444
where do I locate VBA editor on windows 7? I should only do it on te pc having problem right? In my case, it will be win 7 pc?  
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LVL 75

Assisted Solution

by:DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft MVP, Access and Data Platform)
DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft MVP, Access and Data Platform) earned 266 total points
ID: 33653990
"where do I locate VBA editor on windows 7? "
It's part of Office/Access, not Windows per se.
Open Access.
If there are no existing Modules, click to create a new one; or open an existing one.  Either way will expose the VBA Editor.  Then from the menu, Tools>>References.  Look at the list and see if any show:

**MIssing <SomeReferenceName>

Resolve the issue by finding the missing reference, which according to JM79 is in the Win32 folder.

"I should only do it on te pc having problem right?'
Well, it would seem for starters.  You need to do it on whatever PC's have an issue.
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LVL 18

Accepted Solution

by:
Jerry Miller earned 134 total points
ID: 33655194
In Access 2010:
Click on the Database tools tab and open the VBA editor. Then choose Tools>References. Click on the 'asctrls.ocx'  reference. It should be marked as Missing. Then click browse and find it on your computer.
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Author Comment

by:okamon
ID: 33657247
>> Click on the 'asctrls.ocx'  reference. It should be marked as Missing. Then click browse and find it on your computer.

will it be somewhere on my local pc or it is on the pc which shared the database? and it should be in which folder?
0
 
LVL 75

Assisted Solution

by:DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft MVP, Access and Data Platform)
DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft MVP, Access and Data Platform) earned 266 total points
ID: 33657536
s/b your local PC.  If you are not sure where it is, you can do a search using Windows explorer ...

mx
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