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what's the meaning of thiese partitions: /dev/pts,  /dev/shm , /sys?

Posted on 2010-09-13
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what's the meaning of these partitions: /dev/pts,  /dev/shm , /sys?

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Question by:VMWARE
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by:torimar
torimar earned 125 total points
ID: 33667006
/dev/pts is your pseudo terminal device:
http://linux.die.net/man/4/pts
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudo_terminal

/dev/shm is shared memory:
http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/what-is-devshm-and-its-practical-usage.html

/sys is where your virtual filesystem sysfs is located:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sysfs
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Duncan Roe earned 125 total points
ID: 33670349
To elaborate a little on torimar's perfectly correct post: they do not consume any disk space and in fact are not associated with any device. So they are not really "partitions" at all. /proc is similar - just let them be.
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by:VMWARE
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