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Macro/Cmd to Import Excel file into Access

I have a temp table in Access that I import data into and then (based on various criteria) append to a second table.

I'd like to automate the import process into the temp table.  Currently I delete current records and then go through the import wizard, etc, etc.  I'm planning to use a macro and can use all the STD commands fir deleting current records and running update/append queries.  My issue is the import of te Excel file.  Is there a command or something I can run within the macro to do the import?  I will be importing a file with a STD name and set file path location.  It will be imported into an existing table.  Currently using Excel 2003 but will soon be upgrading to 2010 if that needs to be considered.  I am using Access 2000.  Thanks.
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vsllc
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vsllc
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1 Solution
 
als315Commented:
If file name and path is always same, you can link this file to your DB and run queries from macro to delete/append records to existing table. Excel 2010 can save in format of Excel 2003 if there will be any problems with linking Excel 2010 file to Access 2000.
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als315Commented:
I can recommend you to use csv format if you have in one column mixed text and numeric cells.
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vsllcAuthor Commented:
Can't export from source system as csv.

I never thought of linking to Excel.  I'll give it a try.
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als315Commented:
Excel can save file as csv. It can be done with simple macro, which you can run from Access before import, or it is possible from VBA open Excel and save your file as csv. Do it if in linked file some cells will have wrong values.
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vsllcAuthor Commented:
Does the link only impact alphanumeric fields?

How would I add a macro to do thus within my Access macro?  My goal is to basically make this a 1 click process so I don't want to have to open Excel to save ad csv and then start process.
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als315Commented:
You can use this sub for file conversion (compiled from many sources):
(change path from current to your)
Sub SaveAsCSV_xlFile(XlsFileName as string, CSVFileName as string)
    Dim oXL As Object
    Dim sFullPath, sFullPath1 As String
'   Create a new Excel instance
    Set oXL = CreateObject("Excel.Application")
'   Full path of excel file to open
    On Error GoTo ErrHandle
    sFullPath = CurrentProject.Path & XlsFileName
    sFullPath1 = CurrentProject.Path & CSVFileName
'   Open and save as it
    With oXL
        .Visible = True
        .Workbooks.Open (sFullPath)
        .ActiveWorkbook.SaveAs FileName:=sFullPath1, FileFormat:=6
    End With
ErrExit:
    Set oXL = Nothing
    Exit Sub
    
ErrHandle:
    oXL.Visible = False
    MsgBox Err.Description
    GoTo ErrExit
End Sub

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NorieCommented:
Why not take a look at the DoCmd.TransferSpreadsheet method?

That's the usual way to import data from Excel into Access.

It has various arguments you can specify and you can use it to create a new table or append to an existing table.

That should do the import then you can run your queries from code using DoCmd.RunSQL.

No need to open Excel really, in fact if you try to import from an open file you might run into problems.
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als315Commented:
Transferspreadsheet very often can not correctly import fields. Is better use csv file, import (or link) it as text file, and then make conversion to Access tables.
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NorieCommented:
Eh, how?

If you do things properly and the data is well-defined then you should have no problem with TransferSpreadsheet.

Well not any problem you would have importing the same data in CSV format using TransferText.

If there was a problem it would most likely be something to do with data types and it would apply to both methods.

One solution for that is to import to an existing table with the correct data types for the fields.

Another is to import into a table where the fields are all text.

Once you've got the data in Access you can go on and convert it as required, as you've indicated.
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vsllcAuthor Commented:
Thanks.  This worked.
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