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Computers assigned wrong IP addresses

Posted on 2010-09-14
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Last Modified: 2012-05-10
Our networked computers have suddenly started showing IP addresses of 192.168.0.xxx instead of .1.xxx.  The router is 192.168.1.1 (I am typing this on the last computer working).

Even the hard-wired computer is being assigned the bogus address.  Any ideas?
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Question by:DuBoisCG
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Author Comment

by:DuBoisCG
ID: 33675461
BTW:  I have reset the router, hard-reset the router and even put a router we replaced a few months ago in place and get the same thing.
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Expert Comment

by:joseleonardo
ID: 33675475
Try to see if the Dhcp server have the wrong mask 255.255.0.0 or something like that
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Author Comment

by:DuBoisCG
ID: 33675553
The Linksys router has correct mask (see attached).
router.jpg
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Expert Comment

by:jimmyray7
ID: 33675780
If you do an ipconfig /all, it will show the DHCP server.  Perhaps there's a rogue device on your network giving out DHCP leases.
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Expert Comment

by:mmagdy_mickey
ID: 33676050
Make sure that you have configured the dhcp server of the router to offer an range of right ips from DHCP tab in your router you can send your router model to send you screen shots
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Author Comment

by:DuBoisCG
ID: 33676080
THERE ARE SOME DIFFERENCED BETWEEN A WORKING AND NON WORKING COMPUTER.. I PUT THOSE IN CAPS SEPARATED BY LINES OF ******************.

Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7600]
Copyright (c) 2009 Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.

C:\Users\Herb>ipconfig /all

Windows IP Configuration

   Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : HerbLaptop-PC
   Primary Dns Suffix  . . . . . . . :
   Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
   IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
   WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
   DNS Suffix Search List. . . . . . : cable.rcn.com

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : cable.rcn.com
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Realtek RTL8102E/RTL8103E Family PCI-E Fa
st Ethernet NIC (NDIS 6.20)
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-26-9E-A5-EE-F0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Wireless LAN adapter Wireless Network Connection 2:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft Virtual WiFi Miniport Adapter
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 96-4C-E5-37-84-28
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Wireless LAN adapter Wireless Network Connection:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : cable.rcn.com
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Atheros AR9285 802.11b/g/n WiFi Adapter
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 90-4C-E5-37-84-28
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2002:4079:4c8b:1234:c8cd:7b9d:be28:4a03(P
referred)
   Temporary IPv6 Address. . . . . . : 2002:4079:4c8b:1234:f417:b38e:70e6:fc4c(P
referred)
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::c8cd:7b9d:be28:4a03%12(Preferred)
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.106(Preferred)
*********************************************************************
 COMPUTER NOT WORKIING HAS 192.168.0.1 HERE
**************************************************************************


   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Saturday, September 04, 2010 4:14:47 PM
   Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Wednesday, September 15, 2010 3:14:36 PM
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : fe80::200:ff:fe00:0%12
                                       192.168.1.1
   DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
********************************************************************
NON WORKING COMPUTER HAS 192.168.1.101 HERE
*********************************************************************
   DHCPv6 IAID . . . . . . . . . . . : 328223973
   DHCPv6 Client DUID. . . . . . . . : 00-01-00-01-12-FB-BD-79-00-26-9E-A5-EE-F0

   DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 208.59.247.45
                                       208.59.247.46
                                      192.168.1.1
*****************************************************************
NON WORKING COMPUTER DOES NOT HAVE THE  192.168.1.1 ENTRY ABOVE
***********************************************************************************************
   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

Tunnel adapter Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:0:4137:9e76:8b7:bf9:bf86:b374(Prefer
red)
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::8b7:bf9:bf86:b374%14(Preferred)
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :
   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 12:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft 6to4 Adapter
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Tunnel adapter isatap.{1421200B-7791-44E4-BA9A-AA5CBC977EF1}:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft ISATAP Adapter #2
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Tunnel adapter isatap.cable.rcn.com:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : cable.rcn.com
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft ISATAP Adapter #3
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

C:\Users\Herb>

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Expert Comment

by:MISOperations
ID: 33676111
ipconfig /flushdns

ipconfig /renew
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Expert Comment

by:fs40490
ID: 33676282
I would agree with jimmytay7, it sounds like there is another device on the network acting as a DHCP  server.

Or...

Do you have your DNS configured?  The configuration does not show a DNS configuration listed.  If you have a problem try to launch a command prompt and type:

nslookup www.google.com

If is says server timed out or some other error try to type in an IP address in the DHCP configuration.  If it comes back with an IP try to type is as an IP in the browser and see if it makes it.  
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Accepted Solution

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jimmyray7 earned 500 total points
ID: 33676407
The device with IP 192.168.1.101 appears to be the culprit.  If you don't know what/where it is, it might be tricky to track down.  If you have a managed switch, you can lookup it's MAC address and see what port it is running off of.

Let us know what you find.
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Author Comment

by:DuBoisCG
ID: 33677758
This is just a small home network.  We shut down all the Windows 7 computers and everything started working again, so one of those must be configured as a DHCP or be causing some other kind of problem.  I'll know in the morning and assign the points.
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Expert Comment

by:dKrishnasamy
ID: 33679293
Windows 7 will not act as a DHCP server by default, chec kif you have any other router/wireless device conected on your network, if yes remove that device from network.  send me the ipconfig /all output from 192.168.0.xxx ip assigned system
- Krishna
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Expert Comment

by:dosdet2
ID: 33683491
You could also start a "ping 192.168.1.101 -n 10000"
Each ping should time out.
Then boot each computer and watch the ping.  When it starts working, you have your culprit.

If it is a computer, make sure to disconnect it from your network while you check it out, just for safety.
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Author Comment

by:DuBoisCG
ID: 33684072
This seemed to solve the problem (I don't know why yet).

When we shut down the Windows 7 computers, the problem went away.  On each Windows 7 computer we did the following:

Go to
control panel/network and internet/Choose homegroup and sharing options
 
Exit the current homegroup
 
go to services/ HomeGroup Listener  - click properties shut down the service and set startup group to disabled
 
do the same for HomeGroup Provider
 
restart
 
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Expert Comment

by:jimmyray7
ID: 33694588
It appears that one of the Windows 7 computers was acting as a DHCP server, as I suggested.  Shutting down the DCHP server resolved the issue.  I believe my solution answered your question.
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Author Comment

by:DuBoisCG
ID: 33695191
This issue only applies to Windows 7 and the new HomeGroup provider feature.  I found the solution here:

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/77-63-windows-wired-computer-prevents-wireless-connections-router

I'm not sure why this happens, but any suggestion provided here did not lead me to the solution... the question was why is this happening, not how a computer is assigned an IP address.
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Expert Comment

by:dosdet2
ID: 33695467
FYI
After reading this article, it is apparent that the problem is that the Windows 7 computer was setup to share it's internet connection with other computers / devices.  

To do this, Windows 7 had to act like a DHCP server to any device that wanted to share it's connection (DHCP request).  In that way it could act as a "router" and route the internet traffic from it's shared users (the HomeGroup) to it's live internet connection.  


PS - I did not read "Why is this happening?" in the question, I read "Any Ideas?"
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by:DuBoisCG
ID: 33695766
Actually, this problem has yet to be addressed in a MSKB article, so I'm not sure what the problem is.  If you bought 2 brand new Windows 7  computers, they wouldn't both act like a DHCP... I just don't accept that Windows 7 is defaulting a workstation to be a DHCP...  there is obviously a problem with the HomeGroup feature when previous OS are on the network.  

I just spent more time looking around for information and there is some speculation that Windows 7 IPv6 might now be compatible with some routers (which might be the root cause of the proble,).  But other than the site I referenced (and now here) this is the only solution to the problem. (which I am posting).

I like having my solutions accepted as well... but you can't honestly say that "It's a DHCP problem" even got me close to the solution, right?
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Author Comment

by:DuBoisCG
ID: 33695775
Not to mention if someone else looks at this thread, they will not see the actual solution, they will only see your comments, with the correct soltion somewhere lost beneath.
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Expert Comment

by:dosdet2
ID: 33695976
You are correct.  I was trying to give a little more clarity.

There may be a question during the final windows 7 installation (on new computers) that triggers this ( I also doubt that it is the default ).  Even though the instructions in the URL you listed fixed the problem, it doesn't tell the cause (how it got that way).

Is it possible that a user tried to share the internet with a friend or a smart phone or something - without really knowing what they were doing?  Not trying to place blame or anything, just trying to see what could have changed.

Suggestion - try running MalwareBytes on the computer that was the problem.  If it turns up something interesting - Please post it.
Thanks!
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Author Comment

by:DuBoisCG
ID: 33698356
Actually,

It seems this issue has not been resolved as we previously thought.  I will post the requested IP info as requested by Jimmy and perhaps he can find the solution (since I have not).  This problem should remain open.
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Expert Comment

by:dosdet2
ID: 33719748
After reading your IPconfig output again, I see you are attaching to the internet via wireless.    Is it possible that there is a neighboring Wireless router that your computer's are getting their DHCP from?  

Another test to try - on one computer that is not working (XP?).  Open your wireless configuration utility and note which system you are connected to and also note your own system.

Disconnect from whatever you are connected to, Then remove all sites that are not yours.
Reconnect to your site and test the internet.

If that gives no joy, try turning off all windows 7 computers.  Ensure that your XP computer can access the internet.  Turn on each windows 7 computer one at a time and when each one is up, go to a command prompt (on the XP machine) and do these:
> ipconfig /release  <enter>
> ipconfig /renew  <enter>
check your internet connection

When the connection fails, do an IPconfig /all from the XP machine and the from the last Windows 7 machine to be turned on.  Please list these.

That should give some good clues.
:-)
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Author Closing Comment

by:DuBoisCG
ID: 33775413
NAS was assigned .101 and seemed to be controlling other DHCP functions although they appeared turned off
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