batch file not working with run as administrator

S: is a shared drive that contains a batch file   s:\myfolder\mylogin.bat
The batch file needs administrative rights because it has commands that copy files to the c:\program files\directory.

It worked under windows XP, but does not work under Windows 7 pro 64 bit.

If I run it as administrator, it fails when trying to access the S: drive.
If I run it as a normal user, it fails when trying to access the protected C: drive folders.

How do I get it to run with all all rights?


I suspected that Run As Administrator  is using the Local Administrator user profile, which does not have access to the network drive, so I run cmd as administrator.  Sure enough, the dos command line cannot ever do a dir s:
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rberkeConsultantAsked:
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Seth SimmonsConnect With a Mentor Sr. Systems AdministratorCommented:
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Seth SimmonsConnect With a Mentor Sr. Systems AdministratorCommented:
Use a second batch file for Windows 7 and add this line at the beginning:

net use s: \\server\share /persistent:no

When you run as administrator, no drives are mapped.
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rberkeConsultantAuthor Commented:
I solved my problem without using your tip.

Here is a little more detail of my problem.  The annoyance was in myLogin.bat  in \\server\sharedfolder\. All my users run it automatically as part of the sbs daily login script.

On windows 7 machines, the script did not work. A step that copied data from the Server\Sharedfolder to c:\program filehave would fail with access denied to the c: drive.  

I turned of UAC and the problem went away.  

Of course, that solution is dangerous so I turned it back on and come up with a better solution.

I .  I created a shortcut to mylogin.bat in \\server\sharedfolder
2.  I set the mylogin.lnk shortcut property to say Run As Administrator
3.  I changed my sbs login to call myLogin.lnk  instead of myLogin.bat

I am not quite sure I understand why that worked, but it does.

I then discovered that users can also run mylogin.lnk  without any problems.  In other words, the shortcut link myLogin.bat does not lose S drive map whereas right clicking on mylogin.bat does.

This solved my problem.

Thanks for you suggestion anyhow, but  I am giving you points for your efforts.
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rberkeConsultantAuthor Commented:
Thanks even MORE.

I DID need to use your suggestion after all for a different reason.

I occasionally tell the users "Please do a daily reset".  Usually that just means for them to logoff and logon, but sometimes they have a bunch of stuff open.  So, to make things go faster, there is a shortcut on their desktop that lets them run the SBS Logon macro.  

This was working for XP users, but not for Windows 7 users.

To fix it, I created a file called S:\DontDeleteDailyResetInCDrive.bat with the following
   net use s: \\server\myShareName /persistent:no
   call "S:\SBSLogin.bat"

On windows 7 computers, I manually copied it from S: to c:\program files\MyCompanyPrograms\DontDeleteDailyResetInCDrive.bat
I then manually created a desktop shortcut call "Daily Reset.lnk" that has administrative rights.

I tried putting those last two steps into the logon script, but it did not seem to work, and I got tired of playing with it.







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