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stdin and stdout - type any length of string

I want to be able to have the user type in any amount of characters on the screen and then exit when they hit EOF (cntrl-d).

I have tried using getchar which works well but I can't get the characters from the screen.  Aren't the characters the user is typing located in a stdin or stodout file somewhere?  I'd like to be able to access them.

Thanks,
JOe K.
char c = getchar();
while((c = getchar() != EOF){}

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ClaudeWalker
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ClaudeWalker
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1 Solution
 
phoffricCommented:
You don't have balanced parenthesis.Also your c char should be an int.Also, you may not want to initialize c in your definition since the while loop fills in the first char on the first pass. (But that is application dependent.)int c;   while( (c = getchar() ) != EOF){}Note that EOF is an int.
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ClaudeWalkerAuthor Commented:
Sorry, I copied and pasted wrong.  My solution was a shot in the dark.

I guess what I'm after is to use fgets(someBuffer, sizeof(someBuffer), stdin) to grab undetermined user inputted strings line by line from the stdin?

Is there a way I can write to the screen and access those characters (or ints) from stdin?

Thanks,
JOe K.
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xdomainsCommented:
Try this -
int c=0;
while(c != EOF)
{
   c = getc();
}

Note: use Ctrl+Z to exit.
You can enter as many characters on the console. All of them will be read for every 'Enter' key press.
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phoffricCommented:
>> what I'm after is to use fgets(someBuffer, sizeof(someBuffer), stdin) "If the End-of-File is encountered and no characters have been read, the contents of str remain unchanged and a null pointer is returned. If an error occurs, a null pointer is returned. Use either ferror or feof to check whether an error happened or the End-of-File was reached."    http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/fgets/Here is a code snippet modified from this fgets link just to check for stopping condition (i.e., EOF or error).
   char mystring [100];
   while( fgets (mystring , 100 , stdin) != NULL ) {
      puts (mystring);
   }

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phoffricCommented:
If you start writing C++ code, you can use one of these getline() functions:
     http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/string/getline/
     http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/iostream/istream/getline/

You can try this approach as well. Working with string in C++ has benefits over the C-style string. I'll be back tomorrow if you wish to discuss this further.
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ClaudeWalkerAuthor Commented:
Apparently I would have to use "pipes" as a technique to read this (stdin or stdout) buffer.  

Regarding my "solution" is was far from elegant.  I ended up writing the text into a file which I was trying to avoid because it seemed redundant.  Now that I know how to use pipes I'll be able to do this for endevors.

Thanks again,
JOe K.

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phoffricCommented:
>> I would have to use "pipes" as a technique to read this (stdin or stdout) buffer.  
I must be misunderstanding your original question. Would you like to elaborate a little on exactly what you are trying to accomplish? Why are you saying pipes are necessary?
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