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ODBC with Access Word Merge Issues

Posted on 2010-09-16
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Last Modified: 2013-12-25
I am trying to understand the Link Database process in Access.

I have an Access 2007 database with Linked Tables to SQL Server 2008.

The issue I have is when I perform the link from my development machine via ODBC other users cannot open the linked tables from from their machine.  When I perform the link in ACCESS from someone else machine, others are able to open the tables just fine.

So, I am doing something wrong on my machine OR have some version of ODBC installed that won't translate correctly.

The only difference I can see is the following:  When looking at the 'tool tip' on the Access linked table there are the connection properties...

Works:
ODBC; DRIVER=SQL SERVER; SERVER=MYSERVER; UID=BOB;APP=Microsoft Data Access Components;..........

In the ODBC Create New Data Source, Workstation is using SQL Client 2000.85.1117.00   (FILE: SQLSRV32.dll)

Doesn't Work:
ODBC; DRIVER=SQL SERVER; SERVER=MYSERVER; UID=BOB;APP=Microsoft Windows Operating System;.........

OR

ODBC; DRIVER=SQL SERVER; SERVER=MYSERVER; UID=BOB;APP=2007 Microsoft Office System;.........

In the ODBC Create New Data Source, Workstation is using SQL Server Native Client 2009.100.1600.01   (FILE: SQLNCLI10.dll)

I am not sure how to affect/change the APP section during the ODBC Link Process in Access.

OR do I need to install the SQL Native Client on every workstation?  If so, how do I do that?

Can anyone provide some insight?
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Question by:browe68
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by:Surone1
ID: 33695207
sql native client is probably only for the local machine..
is the server the only machine that works?
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by:Surone1
ID: 33695258
"Driver={SQL Server};Server=machine\instance;Database=dbname;Uid=sa;Pwd=password;"
for ado connections something like this works in my case..
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by:browe68
ID: 33695302
If I link tables from the development workstation that has the SQL Native Client, that workstation operates fine and can open up the SQL Server (linked) tables in Access.

However, none of the other machines can.   So, I am guessing that I need to distribute the SQL Native Client 10 to everyone.

If I perform the links from a different workstation that has an earlier Client = (SQL Client 2000.85.1117.00   (FILE: SQLSRV32.dll), then all the workstation can open the SQL Server Tables (linked).   I assume all workstations (over 100) have this client on their system.
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by:Surone1
ID: 33695379
oops, yeah i oversaw that "detail"
but it only takes one upgrade to see if it works then.
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by:browe68
ID: 33695894
The solution is to upgrade all clients to SQL Native Client 10.   I am wondering if there is an easy way to do this?
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Surone1 earned 500 total points
ID: 33695939
there may be if all of the client machines are part of the same domain, but that would be a question for other zones i guess..
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