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Create extended wireless network

Hello experts,

Here's how it is:

I have a network with several servers and a firewalled internet access works like a charm.

Now we have to add a location...

What's particular about it is it only has electricity and a device that I need to connect to my network... Oh! and it's 300 meters(1000') away.

Going with a wire/fiber is not an option, adding an internet connection then using VPN is also out of the question.  

So I am left with using 2 routers as access points, but this is where I'm stumped.  How do I configure such a thing?

Here's the lowdown:

Routers (B and C on attached diagram) are both D-Link WBR-2310
Device (D on attached diagram) will be directly attached to C
Computer already on my network (A on attached diagram) must be able to access D

Direct connection to D has already been made directly, so I don't need you to figure that one out.  All I need to figure out is how to pass from A through B wirelessly through C to finally connect to D...


Network.jpg
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frankky
Asked:
frankky
1 Solution
 
jorlando66Commented:
You can use a non line of site connection.  I have these at several offices  one which is a mile from the dmarc and they work like a charm and at 500.00 its a bargain.  Good luck

http://www.radiolabs.com/products/wireless/point-to-point-bridge-circular.php
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latchwaysCommented:
I really would not use 802.11x to travel 300m. If you have line of sight use a point to point laser link. That would take all of the pain away as the destination would appear as part of the main network.
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jorlando66Commented:
THe radiolabs has one unit which connects to your switch/router at site A..Links to site B and hands out wired and wireless LAN at site B on same subnet as A
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kf4zmtCommented:
I'm not familiar D-Link routers, but in general wifi terms, you should be able to set them up as bridges.  If you use directional antennas at each end, the 1000' distance shouldn't be a problem.  Believe it or not, under the correct conditions with high gain antennas, wifi can actually propagate for miles.  

This doesn't mean your speed will be anything to brag about though.  802.11g has an actual throughput of only around 18 Mb/s under ideal conditions.  When you bridge, you'll cut that rate in half.  If your signal conditions aren't ideal, it will be slower still.
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frankkyAuthor Commented:
I already have some hardware, I want to try and work with it, not buying brand new hardware for the sake of it.

I like what kf4zmt suggests, since I already have 2 good directional antennas.  I've been looking around on the web and it seems that WBR2310 cannot be bridged, so I'm gonna buy a bridge and try that, will keep you updated on the progress.
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jorlando66Commented:
You said you werent buying new hardware for the sake of it..Now your buying a bridge :)  Let us know how it works.
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vernonyCommented:
many wireless routers has bridge/repeater function, i think that's what you needed
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frankkyAuthor Commented:
Was able to test it all now,

The WBR-2310 does not include bridging :( so I was able to get a Dlink DAP-1522 which is made and sold for that purpose.

It all works flawlessly.
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