Performance XPS SP3 & Windows 7

Describe some of the key technical support differences, as well as performance differences, between XPSP3 and Windows7? Windows 7 out performed XPSP3 on all the bench test.
unix32Asked:
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JohnConnect With a Mentor Business Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Windows 7 is faster than XP in general. But is not as simple as that.

1. An OS will be faster if it has more memory. XP and other 32-bit systems are limited to 3Gb of memory (which is usually sufficient). But a 64-bit system can use 4Gb and beyond. For that you need Windows 7 Pro 64-bit.
2. A faster hard drive (7200-rpm vs. 5400-prm) will make a system faster.
3. A dual or quad processor will make things faster and you need Windows 7 64-bit for that.

Now put all that together (which I what I have on my Thinkpad T61p) and it will run rings aournd XP in real world work. I would never return to XP given the speed I have achieved with this. ... Thinkpads_User
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LMiller7Commented:
Windows 7 will perform better, provided that the computer has sufficient resources to support it. XP will perform better on limited resource systems.

XP was released in 2001 and was designed to operate with as little as 64MB of RAM. This put some severe constraints on the performance features that could be implemented. Win 7 was released in 2009 when systems with 2GB RAM and more were common. This allowed the designers to implement features like Superfetch. Win 7 is also able take to take advantage of modern hardware that did not exist when XP was released.
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fleamourianCommented:
"A dual or quad processor will make things faster and you need Windows 7 64-bit for that" - thinkpads_user.  

A 64-bit dual/quad CPU will run 32-bit OS just as well.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
But you cannot use more memory with a 32-bit OS (which was part of my overall point). For lighter use, you are correct, but it seems like a bit of waste to me. ... Thinkpads_User
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fleamourianCommented:
@ thinkpads_user

Ah, OK.  Sorry.  I run 32-bit because I'm a stick in the mud.

One thing I would say is that the biggest performance jump is seen when upgrading from single core to dual core.  There are not many apps that are configured to take advantage of, say, all four cores at once.  Which seems a bit of a waste to me.

Buuuut what with i7 6 core CPUs on the market I guess why not?  But may wanna save your hard earned cash unless you need all that power for video editing/gaming or something...
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fleamourianCommented:
Also a solid state HDD is probably the most significant performance upgrade you can make.  Boot times & general responsiveness are reportedly dramatically increased.  

However XP does not support SSDs without messy hacks that I would not be happy using.  But once again there is a price premium.  Most people hard partition there OS on a SSD while using traditional HDDs for storage.  There are even hybrid drives which are a combination of both technologies.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Performance is an overall integrated thing taking advantage of all of CPU, memory and hard disk speed).

My old XP box died and the new one is an i7. It is just vastly faster within Windows 7 64-bit and even somewhat faster than my T61p with 2 CPU's. .... Thinkpads_User
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fleamourianCommented:
True that:  "Performance is an overall integrated thing taking advantage of all of CPU, memory and hard disk speed."
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Thank you. I was pleased to assist. ... Thinkpads_User
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