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After disconnecting my regular switch and connecting a Cisco Small Business Gigabit Switch with QoS (model # SG 102-24) none of my computers can communicate with each other.

Posted on 2010-09-19
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Last Modified: 2012-06-21
After disconnecting my regular switch and connecting a Cisco Small Business Gigabit Switch with QoS (model # SG 102-24) none of my computers can communicate with each other.

However, as soon as I hooked the old DLink switch back up and plugged all of the network cables into it, my network's computers were once again able to fully communicate with each other, communicate with the server, and open internet web pages.

According to this Cisco SG 102-24 switch's documentation, no type of configuration is necessary--all that you have to do is to power on the switch and then plug all of the network cables into it. I have done this, and none of the computer were able to communicate with each other.

What do I need to do so that this switch will allow all of my network's computers to fully communicate with each other and with the internet?
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Question by:Knowledgeable
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7 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:David Linker
ID: 33713763
Please advise the model of DLink switch you previously had so further trouble shooting is possible.

Is your old DLink switch really a router?  Does it have a DHCP server built in?  If so, then your new Cisco Switch won't have this function.
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R. Andrew Koffron earned 500 total points
ID: 33713769
return it and get a new one, the Cisco SG 102-24  is an unmanaged switch it should just work.
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Expert Comment

by:R. Andrew Koffron
ID: 33713776
djlinker is right though if the d-link is a router, and handing out DHCP removing it would cripple the network.

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Author Comment

by:Knowledgeable
ID: 33713779
What would be involved with me programming my Cisco SG 102-24 switch to get it to work properly?

Is it a matter of simply programming which port the internet uplink is connected to and to designate all the other switch ports as LAN ports?
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Assisted Solution

by:R. Andrew Koffron
R. Andrew Koffron earned 500 total points
ID: 33713840
the cisco is a non-managed device, it's supposed to just work, if doesn't return it.

if the d-link was a router, you either need to set all your machine to static IP addresses, or get a DHCP server,

if it was an internet router, you will also nee NAT(network address translation) or static Addresses from your ISP.

since you mention "internet port" I'll assume the d-link is a router, and you will need a new router,

it's sort of like complaining your car doesn't fly, a switch is a switch, a router is a router AND most have switches.

no amount of engine tuning is going to make your car fly. and no amount of programing is going to make a switch into a router.

they are two different things.
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Author Comment

by:Knowledgeable
ID: 33713926
I don't remember the model number of the D-Link. However, I don't believe that it is a router, since it has 24 ports.
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Assisted Solution

by:R. Andrew Koffron
R. Andrew Koffron earned 500 total points
ID: 33713940
yeah I've never heard of a d-link 24 port router, but that still probably leaves you with a bad cisco switch.

go to any machine and do ipconfig /all and find out what the DHCP server address is, than attempt to connect to it with a web browser, and remote desktop. till you figure out what is givving out IPs in your network.

you can also try getting your current IP info than setting it manually(on a couple machines), and see if your machines can use the cisco.

if your not replacing a router it really sounds like a bad switch. can you get a hold of a smaller switch to borrow and test a few of the machines?
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