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Solaris 10 /etc/system parmeters configuration

Posted on 2010-09-20
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Last Modified: 2012-05-10
I try to configure kernel parameters for oracle installation, but in /etc/system I see only text file with commented text.
Where I can find real system configuration file?
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Question by:gbcbr
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by:arnold
ID: 33718153
oracle often provided what kernel parameters need to be added to Solaris OS.


The newer Solaris 10 uses a different set/approach to do the same see:
http://www.oracle-base.com/articles/10g/OracleDB10gR2InstallationOnSolaris10.php
note the example in the link deals with a X86 based system.  If you have a Sparc based system, the name of the install media will not have X86.
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by:nognew
ID: 33718157
Hi there!
 /etc/system is the real system configuration file for Solaris. What options do you want to configure?
You just need to uncomment the ones you need, or change values for the ones you need.
Cheers,
t.
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Author Comment

by:gbcbr
ID: 33718196
Hi,
I don't believe that this is configuration file:
*ident      "@(#)system      1.18      97/06/27 SMI" /* SVR4 1.5 */
*
* SYSTEM SPECIFICATION FILE
*

* moddir:
*
*      Set the search path for modules.  This has a format similar to the
*      csh path variable. If the module isn't found in the first directory
*      it tries the second and so on. The default is /kernel /usr/kernel
*
*      Example:
*            moddir: /kernel /usr/kernel /other/modules



* root device and root filesystem configuration:
*
*      The following may be used to override the defaults provided by
*      the boot program:
*
*      rootfs:            Set the filesystem type of the root.
*
*      rootdev:      Set the root device.  This should be a fully
*                  expanded physical pathname.  The default is the
*                  physical pathname of the device where the boot
*                  program resides.  The physical pathname is
*                  highly platform and configuration dependent.
*
*      Example:
*            rootfs:ufs
*            rootdev:/sbus@1,f8000000/esp@0,800000/sd@3,0:a
*
*      (Swap device configuration should be specified in /etc/vfstab.)



* exclude:
*
*      Modules appearing in the moddir path which are NOT to be loaded,
*      even if referenced. Note that `exclude' accepts either a module name,
*      or a filename which includes the directory.
*
*      Examples:
*            exclude: win
*            exclude: sys/shmsys



* forceload:
*
*      Cause these modules to be loaded at boot time, (just before mounting
*      the root filesystem) rather than at first reference. Note that
*       forceload expects a filename which includes the directory. Also
*      note that loading a module does not necessarily imply that it will
*      be installed.
*
*      Example:
*            forceload: drv/foo



* set:
*
*      Set an integer variable in the kernel or a module to a new value.
*      This facility should be used with caution.  See system(4).
*
*      Examples:
*
*      To set variables in 'unix':
*
*            set nautopush=32
*            set maxusers=40
*
*      To set a variable named 'debug' in the module named 'test_module'
*
*            set test_module:debug = 0x13
             
 
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Expert Comment

by:nognew
ID: 33718266
it is the config file. the bottom section actually tells how to set options,. you just need to know the options.

t.
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Expert Comment

by:arnold
ID: 33718303
This are Solaris kernel options that are loaded during system boot.
i.e. during boot the solaris kernel processes this file and sets the parameters within accordingly.

The link I posted that references:
set semsys:seminfo_semmni=100
set semsys:seminfo_semmsl=256
set shmsys:shminfo_shmmax=4294967295
set shmsys:shminfo_shmmni=100
Were usually the adjustments need on unix/linux to maximize the prioritization/handling of secific tasks.
Note that some of these variables are dependent on the Installed RAM as well as the planned use of the system, number of requests, etc.
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Author Comment

by:gbcbr
ID: 33718353
Yes, I have the same, but how I can change them? And also I have to change SWAP to 16GB and maximum user processes from 16379 to 16384. Where I can do these changes?
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by:arnold
ID: 33718410
process control is through ulimit/limit.
TO change the swap, you would need to repartition the drive to allocate a 16GB partition for swap or add a file and declare it for use with swap.
You could use cachefs to create a file on the filesystem that will be used for caching.
To avoid having to repartition the system or add another drive to the system.
http://www.tech-recipes.com/rx/163/add-swap-space-temporarily-in-solaris/
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Expert Comment

by:nognew
ID: 33718414
you can't change swap via that file, SWAP is whole another story, where you need to allocate a file with appropriate space and assign it as a swap file.

TO increase maximum user processes just add the following line to the bottom of the file and reboot:

set maxuprc = 16384

Cheers,
t.
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Expert Comment

by:arnold
ID: 33718433
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Author Comment

by:gbcbr
ID: 33725024
I solve this issue with arnold links, SWAP and maxuprc, thank you very much.
/etc/system file doesn't work in Solaris 10, you can wright there what ever you like with no execution.
Only manual entering with adb -kw has immediate result
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Expert Comment

by:arnold
ID: 33725066
The /etc/system file alterations only take effect after a reboot.  adb is the tool to dynamically alter kernel settings which remain in effect until the system reboots if corresponding entries are not added to the /etc/system file.
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Author Comment

by:gbcbr
ID: 33725111
for me this theory. I had reboot 3 times with set maxuprc = 16384 in system file and when Oracle installer starts check system it said all the time - you have only 16379. When I used adb and change it to 16384, even during installation, just Retry after and everything passed.
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Expert Comment

by:nognew
ID: 33726030
Try to increase maxusers.
set maxusers = <something higher than you alrady got>
The value of maxuprc is calculated value it might not take effect if you just assign a value to it.
It is also depends on physical memory available on the box. Try not to kill your box.
Cheers,
t.
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Accepted Solution

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gbcbr earned 0 total points
ID: 33728005
I checked with adb -k ( premium utility - change everything in one second ) max users = 1022 it's crazy number for SE.
I want  5 users, so my demands have to be 5*16 +5 - why I have to put uprc  for 1022 users?
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