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unix script

i have n number of files  in a directory(example below)

directory: dev/source/
capture_1.xml
capture_2.xml
capture_3.xml
..
..


i need to move the files with new names (append timestamp with milli seconds) to other directory   /dev/archive/
eg:
capture_1.xml is renamed to   Sourceile_<timestampWithMilliSeconds)



can someone provide a unix script?
Thanks
0
sunshine737
Asked:
sunshine737
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1 Solution
 
arnoldCommented:
find /dev/source | while read a; do
timestamp_with_miliseconds=`stat $a | grep 'Modify:' | sed -e 's/^.*\: //' -e 's/\-0800//' |awk ' { print $1"_"$2 } '`
mv $a "/dev/archive/$a_$timestamp_with_milliseconds.xml"
done

Note the -0800 is the timezone offset.

Modify can be changed depending on what you want.
run stat on a file and you will see the Access and Change options as well.

If you want to decouple the capture_1 and .xml it can be done.
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sunshine737Author Commented:
i do have some other files in /dev/source/.   i just want to move the files with capture_*.xml only.
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arnoldCommented:
find /dev/source | grep 'capture.*\.xml' | while
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sunshine737Author Commented:
any other simple way instead of the below line:

timestamp_with_miliseconds=`stat $a | grep 'Modify:' | sed -e 's/^.*\: //' -e 's/\-0800//' |awk ' { print $1"_"$2 } '`
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arnoldCommented:
you can use a perl script and use a UNIX timestamp format (number of seconds since epoch January 1st 1970 GMT.)
the same command stat('filename')[9] has the modify timestamp
http://perldoc.perl.org/functions/stat.html

Not sure why you want milliseconds as it seems that the creation stamp is in seconds.

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TintinCommented:
Are you wanting the timestamp to be the current time of the modification time of the file?

If you want the modification time of the file in milliseconds, almost all *nix filesystems don't support this.
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sunshine737Author Commented:
would it be simple without milli seconds?

if so, i am ok with that..
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arnoldCommented:
What is the problem with the above assignment line?  Is a perl script something you are familiar with?
The example provided is a quick and semi-simple way to do what you asked.
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sunshine737Author Commented:


source:
directory: dev/source/
capture_1.xml
capture_2.xml
capture_3.xml
..
...

output:
in directory:  /dev/archive

20100721_093016_capture_1.xml
20100721_093017_capture_2.xml
20100721_093017_capture_3.xml


just the date,hours ,minutes,seconds is enough,as each file is already having unique filename (capture_<serialNumber>.xml)


sorry,for not providing the info initially.

Thanks
0
 
sunshine737Author Commented:
i tried the following. but the value from filenamewithoutDir is getting null.

find /dev/source | grep 'capture.*\.xml' |while read a; do
filenamewithoutdir=basename $a
newfileName=`date +%Y%m%d_%H%M%S`_$filenamewithoutdir
mv $newfileName /dev/archive
done


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arnoldCommented:
you would need to use perl or process the data
The alternative is to use the perl script to build the timestamp.
remove the while() { and the closing }
The open/close
Put
$_=$ARGV[0];
replace the rename with print

such that you within the shell script have
$timestamp=`perlscript $filename`;
Note you should use the full path for the filename.
#!/usr/bin/perl
open DIR,"ls|";
while (<DIR>) {
chomp();
@date_of_modification=localtime((stat("$_"))[9]);
$year=$date_of_modification[5]+1900;
$mon=1+$date_of_modification[4];
$mon = ($mon<=9) ? "0".$mon: $mon;
$day=$date_of_modification[3]; 
$day= ($day<9) ? "0".$day :$day;
$hour=$date_of_modification[2];
$min=$date_of_modification[1];
$sec=$date_of_modification[0];
$min = ($min<10) ? "0".$min : $min;
$hour= ($hour<10) ? "0".$hour:$hour;
$sec= ($sec<10) ? "0".$sec:$sec;
$timestamp="$year$mon$day"."_"."$hour$min$sec";
rename ($_,"/dev/archive/$timestamp"."_"."$_");
}
close(DIR)

Alternative: as script that will output the timestamp for a file provided on the command line.  note this does not check whether an argument is being passed
#!/usr/bin/perl
$_=$ARGV[0];
chomp();
@date_of_modification=localtime((stat("$_"))[9]);
$year=$date_of_modification[5]+1900;
$mon=1+$date_of_modification[4];
$mon = ($mon<=9) ? "0".$mon: $mon;$day=$date_of_modification[3]; 
$day= ($day<9) ? "0".$day :$day;$hour=$date_of_modification[2];
$min=$date_of_modification[1];
$sec=$date_of_modification[0];
$min = ($min<10) ? "0".$min : $min;
$hour= ($hour<10) ? "0".$hour:$hour;
$sec= ($sec<10) ? "0".$sec:$sec;
$timestamp="$year$mon$day"."_"."$hour$min$sec";
print "$timestamp\n";

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arnoldCommented:
You need to enclose the basedir $a in execution ticks ` i.e.
filenamewithoutdir=`basename $a`
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TintinCommented:
arnold, you can hugely simpify your code
#!/usr/bin/perl
use POSIX 'stftime';

foreach my $file (<*>) {
   my $ts = strftime "%Y%m%d_%H%M%S",localtime((stat($file))[9]);
   rename $file, "/dev/archive/$ts$file" or warn "Could not rename $file $!\n";
}

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