[Okta Webinar] Learn how to a build a cloud-first strategyRegister Now

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 2270
  • Last Modified:

SQL 2008 disk space is full

Hi,

I've got a SQL 2008 server that is out of disk space.  I'm assuming this is because a backup has never been done before and the transaction logs are out of control.  The server is running in Win 2k8 R2 on  an ESX host.  

I've just create a new disk for the backup, but when I try to add windows backup roll, it is asking me to bounce the server because there are some MS updates that require it to, so I need to wait until end of school.

My question is - will the backup automatically truncate the transaction logs?

Thanks

Matt
0
mattleedc
Asked:
mattleedc
1 Solution
 
arweeksCommented:
Yes, once it's backed up the logs should be deleted freeing up the disk space.
It's worth checking this is the issuse, you should be able to find the location of the logs in enterprise manager.
You should really setup automated backup to happen regularly.
0
 
Ephraim WangoyaCommented:
@arweeks
the logs should be deleted?

@mattleedc,
Just truncate the log to a reasonable size after the backup
Backup will not automatically truncate your log files.
You can set up a job that will truncate the log at some time intervals, every month or so
0
 
mattleedcAuthor Commented:
ewangoya,

How do you truncate them automatically?
0
Free learning courses: Active Directory Deep Dive

Get a firm grasp on your IT environment when you learn Active Directory best practices with Veeam! Watch all, or choose any amount, of this three-part webinar series to improve your skills. From the basics to virtualization and backup, we got you covered.

 
Ephraim WangoyaCommented:

Open Studio Manager,
Expand Management,
Right click on Maintenance Plans and create a new maintenance plan
Specify what you want to do in the maintenance plan
0
 
mattleedcAuthor Commented:
OK, I have had a look and all the databases have been backing up to a folder on the same drive as the database itself amongst many other databases.  This has been configured by a tech that has now left the school.  There was no expiry date set up the backup, so this folder has just been expanding until it is full.  When I try to add an expiry date and click OK, I get

TITLE: Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio
------------------------------

Backup failed for Server 'TCDB01'.  (Microsoft.SqlServer.SmoExtended)

For help, click: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink?ProdName=Microsoft+SQL+Server&ProdVer=10.0.2531.0+((Katmai_PCU_Main).090329-1045+)&EvtSrc=Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.ExceptionTemplates.FailedOperationExceptionText&EvtID=Backup+Server&LinkId=20476

------------------------------
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

System.Data.SqlClient.SqlError: A nonrecoverable I/O error occurred on file "D:\Data\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL10.MSSQLSERVER\MSSQL\Backup\PaperCut_backup_2010_09_05_170001_4779470.bak:" 112(failed to retrieve text for this error. Reason: 15105). (Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo)

For help, click: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink?ProdName=Microsoft+SQL+Server&ProdVer=10.0.2531.0+((Katmai_PCU_Main).090329-1045+)&LinkId=20476

------------------------------
BUTTONS:

OK
------------------------------

Does this have something to do with there being 0bytes free on the disk?

If so how safe is it to delete old .bak files from the backup folder?

Thanks
0
 
Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3]Billing EngineerCommented:
full and log backup do NOT shrink files automatically!
log backup will only release the space "internally".

to actually reduce file sizes, you need to use
DBCC SHRINKFILE command:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189493.aspx

for data files, this will only work if there is free space...
for log files, this might not work "the first time", you might need some turns of transaction log backups + transactions. however, with a full disk, you might use another path:
* ensure all connections to the application/database stop
* ensure you know all files part of the database
* detach the database
* delete the .ldf file(s) of the database
* attach the database without the .ldf files, which should recreate new file(s)

after that, ensure you implement regular transaction log backups (regular = hourly ...) with database in full recovery mode, or change the db into simple recovery mode (ONLY if you don't need to restore into a point in time, ever)
0
 
Mark WillsTopic AdvisorCommented:
Unless you are using SIMPLE recovery model, you do have to manage your Logs (and even then, they can still grow out of control).

If you have current problems, then you can use SSMS to help reclaim some space.

You really should try to take a full backup first.

If you right click on your database, go into tasks, shrink files you can select the LOG file to shrink. Choose the middle option, shrink with reorganise. It will show you how big it is and how much you *should* be able to recover.

You can also try setting your database to SIMPLE recovery model, take a backup, and then do the shrink file and revert to FULL recovery (again in SSMS, right click the database, go into properties and on the "options" page you can set / change recovery models).

Have a read of : http://www.experts-exchange.com/Microsoft/Development/MS-SQL-Server/SQL-Server-2005/A_657-Managing-the-Transaction-Log-for-the-Accidental-DBA.html

It explains things in more detail, along with using maintenance plans to help manage your database / transaction log.
0
 
TempDBACommented:
It would be recommended to change the address of the backup as it won't effect the functioning of your server.
0

Featured Post

Get quick recovery of individual SharePoint items

Free tool – Veeam Explorer for Microsoft SharePoint, enables fast, easy restores of SharePoint sites, documents, libraries and lists — all with no agents to manage and no additional licenses to buy.

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now