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Kickstart RPM platform issue

I used Kickstart for servers having x86_64 architecture.  But it installs even i386 RPMs.  I just want it to install only x86_64.  What should I do.  Just in case you want to look, here is my kickstart.

Note: If I remove comment from my first line, ksvalidator objects

Unknown command: platform=x86,

I tried platform=AMD64 but it doesn't work either.

This brings the following questions to my mind:
1.  Is the 'plateform' keyword working at all in kickstart?
2.  Are x86_64 RPMs independent of i386 RPMs?  I do not recall ever seeing x86_64 RPMs installed totally without i386--I am not saying this is the way it is supposed to be.  But can x86_64 RPMs be installed without i386?  If so, how.

My Kickstart file is attached





ks.txt
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farzanj
Asked:
farzanj
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2 Solutions
 
larsrohrCommented:
No, I don't think the 'platform' command is valid.
Here's a current kickstart option reference:
  http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/enterprise/RHEL-5-manual/Installation_Guide-en-US/s1-kickstart2-options.html

I use a different 'url' option for my x86_64 kickstarts and i386 kickstarts, e.g.:
  url --url=http://192.168.0.254/packages/i386
  url --url=http://192.168.0.254/packages/x86_64

So for my x86_64 machines, the ks.cfg would use the latter, and would install from the x86_64 tree.


I do see that there are plenty of i386 rpms in the default x86_64 tree, and a little googling around seems to indicate that they are there primarily for the compat support, and that using glibc.i686 may be responsible for pulling in lots of the other i386 rpms.  Unfortunately, it doesn't seem that there's a straight-forward way of simply excluding all i386 rpms.  Two alternatives I do see:
1. delete all the i386 rpms from your install source tree.
2. add a %post section to your ks.cfg to remove unwanted rpms, e.g.:
     %post
     yum -y remove glibc.i686


Are you wanting to avoid i386 rpms due to space, bandwidth, or other reasons?  Or just looking for a "clean" x86_64 system?
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farzanjAuthor Commented:
I wanted to eliminate any extra stuff -- making it clean and system.  Yes, I wanted to save space as much as I could.  By bandwidth do you mean saving it during the install?  After the install, I don't see how it is saved.  

Yes, the i386 are picked and there doesn't appear to be a way to get rid of them.

I am nervous about erasing i386 RPMs later as it may break something.
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larsrohrCommented:
Yes, bandwidth savings are only during the install.

Saving disk space, eliminating extra unneeded packages, and keeping the system clean -- that sounds fine, and is in line with the goals of others who were looking for similar solutions.

Using the "yum -y remove glibc.i686" method, whether as part of the %post in your kickstart, or run manually after installation, may not remove every i386 rpm, but it will probably get most of them (about 300+ on one of my systems).  But it has a nice advantage, too:  If you do find something broken (say, some third-party vendor software that was compiled against the i686 glibc), you can very easily run "yum -y install glibc.i686" to reverse the situation.

I would only recommend removing All i386 rpms from the installation source, if you have a test machine to install on and play with, so you can verify that nothing seems broken.
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farzanjAuthor Commented:
Disappointing to learn about more deficiencies of Kickstart/ RPM problems.
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