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sndPlaySound works for A.wav not for B.wav

Have an app in C++ and I call sndPlaySound to play wav files.   Has worked fine on hundreds
of PCs.  Now I have it on one particluar PC, running windows 7, and my code will play one wave file just fine, but won't play another wav file -- instead emits a little strange beep.  That is,
it plays "A.wav" just fine but won't play "B.wav".  If I go out to windows on this PC and play the
files with the windows media player, they both play fine.  Playing from my code on other PCs they both play fine.  So, its driving me nuts.  What can it be?  Maybe the wav files use different codecs and although windows media player can use both, my app (via winmm.lib) does not have access to one of the codecs?  Just a guess - how can I tell if a differnt codec is in use?
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tullhead
Asked:
tullhead
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1 Solution
 
rockiroadsCommented:
Well I thought it might of been codec but if it plays outside your app, I was not sure that might be the case.
Not sure how winmm.lib works, maybe it does work with certain codecs or possibly format of wav file ie number of bits etc

you can have a look at avicodec to help you determine whats in use http://avicodec.duby.info/
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marcodalzottoCommented:
As a first thing, I would check the file audio difference between A.wav and B.wav by going on the files properties. There you can find the Audio Format, Bit speed etc... Please post the properties.
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AndyAinscowFreelance programmer / ConsultantCommented:
Are A and B in the same directory?  Put another way is the directory that B is in available (User Access Control) to your app.  (I assume you use the full path to specify which file to play, otherwise check the path is correct as well).



From help files:
Remarks
If the specified sound cannot be found, sndPlaySound plays the system  default sound.
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tullheadAuthor Commented:
A.wav that plays from my app:

Bit Rate: 1411 kbps
Audio Sample Size:  16 bit
Channels: 2 (stereo)
Audio Sample Rate: 44 khz
Audio Format: PCM

B.wav that plays in windows but not in my app:

Bit Rate: 177 kbps
Audio Sample Size:  4 bit
Channels: 1 (mono)
Audio Sample Rate: 44 khz
Audio Format: IMA ADPCM

Wow - that was a good suggestion - because I thought they were similar, but they are quite different.
But what does it mean, and is there a way I can get my app to play B.wav -- or should I try to convert format of B to be similar to A ?
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tullheadAuthor Commented:
AndyAinscow -- yes I have them both in same directory.  Even renamed them to the identical file name at one point - so that is not the issue...
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pgnatyukCommented:
A and B are different: stereo and mono, different bit rate and sample size, different audio format.

B:
"Windows supports IMA ADPCM ".wav" files in 4-bit format only and at sample rates between 8 and 41KHz"
http://www.xentec.be/products/vox_studio/help/ima_adpcm_format.htm
http://wiki.multimedia.cx/index.php?title=IMA_ADPCM
http://www.free-codecs.com/guides/How_to_install_default_codecs_in_Windows_XP_2000.htm

I think, the question is not about MFC or Windows API or a programming language, but about audio codecs.
Maybe it makes a sense to test another wav-file in the same format on this computer.
 
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AndyAinscowFreelance programmer / ConsultantCommented:
>> If I go out to windows on this PC and play the files with the windows media player, they both play fine.

Odd.  Everything to support 'B' seems to be in place, and the paths to A and B are in order.  Please make certain with the paths not that you have something like the following

PlaySound("C:\mysounds\test\A.wav") and PlaySound("B.wav")

where the system then plays a beep because B isn't being found.



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marcodalzottoCommented:
Sorry, the the suggestion I gave before, is because I guess you miss the IMA ADPCM codec.
I am not secure but I think Windows Media Player use his own codecs.
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rockiroadsCommented:
marcodalzotto, you having some personal problems? since you say you are not secure

:D
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marcodalzottoCommented:
Yep! I do!

My personal problem is that my english is bad, and most of the time I translate italian saying to english!!
Please be patient with me...

:P
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rockiroadsCommented:
lol.
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tullheadAuthor Commented:
I think the key must be that windows media player must have "its own codecs" rather than relying on codecs that are installed on the PC.  Thats the only explanation that makes sense.  I tried and failed trying to install gobs of codecs, so I reformatted the audio files into a more common (apparently) codec, and now they play everywhere, including the formerly-troublesome computer.
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