How to collect POP3 emails in Exchange 2010

dickchan
dickchan used Ask the Experts™
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We have two offices. One at China and one at Hong Kong.
There is an no email server at China. Email and DNS are hosted at third party agent company at China. There are 40 Colleagues at Hong Kong side are using POP3 with outlook via internet.

In order to have better performance and email backup at server side, we are going to setup an Exchange 2010 server at Hong Kong office. And we need to keep use existing email domain and keep no change on China side setting.
Any idea how can we do that?
I am new to exchange, could exchange use POP to collect mails and send emails via agent SMTP server?
Many thanks.
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AkhaterSolutions Architect

Commented:
do you have any kind of vpn between the 2 offices ? what is the connection like ?

Author

Commented:
Only internet between two offices. And we can not change settings at China side.
Therefore, we want to use a exchange server to collect POP emails.
Swapping them over to using the Outlook Web App.  http://www.microsoft.com/exchange/2010/en/us/outlook-web-app.aspx
This is just a web based access to your Exchange server.  Any web browser will provide them with access to mail and be able to send.

This link also helpful if you really want and need PoP access.  http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb691018.aspx
Solutions Architect
Commented:
exchange do not collect emails, however you can use a 3rd party tool.

here is a list to get you started
http://www.msexchange.org/software/POP3-Downloaders/
Commented:
You should investigate using RPC/HTTPS since you're using Outlook. In this way you can have encrypted communications, rather than fully-unencrypted sniffable traffic including usernames & passwords, and you can have the full Outlook experience including shared global address list, calendars, server-side compliance and archival, etc.  POP3 has no place in the enterprise, especially if you own actual secure technologies.  Additionally, as Emredrum76 suggests, you can just allow them to hit it via OWA which is a rich server-side experience, and also offers support for ActiveSync to their devices.  POP3 is from a previous century, please don't bring it into this one if you can help it!  :)

-tom

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