What's the max amount of base XP images any one person has had running on a VMware View environment?

khdonabergerwidener
khdonabergerwidener used Ask the Experts™
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We're trying to utilize VMWare View in a desktop virtualization solution and have a huge R900 Dell 4U server with 64Gig of RAM and dual quadcore 2.93Ghz processors with no luck.  We tried logging 10 workstations in all at once and it cripples the server, maxes out the CPU and it doesn't really seem to come back down.  We're trying to duplicate a classroom environment where an entire class would log on at once.  We're reading that you should be able to run roughly 20 VMs at once on a server like this.  Is there something we're doing wrong that would spike the CPU with a base XP image with nothing installed?
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Hi,

What is the spec of your XP vm's? Are you using local storage or Fiber connected?

Cheers,

Commented:
Make sure the shares are set to normal, and reservation is set to 0.

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Commented:
@bhzdkh: What do you mean the shares?  The Resource group in the VIC where the VMs are getting created to?
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Commented:
@ianmellor: The specs are 2 CPUs with 2Gig of RAM.

Commented:
on your ESX host where all the VMs are , right click on the VM, select edit virtual machine properties, go to resources.
Or if you have a vCenter, and have a pool these are set on the pool itself

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Commented:
@bhzdkh: We have a resource pool.

Commented:
What are the reservation settings?

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Commented:
@bhzdkh: Well at the time of the tests it was cranked all the way up by default...what exactly does that mean?
Commented:
It means that it will keep the amount of mermory/cpu that you have reserved for that pool and will not let any other VM or pool to use that amount.
There are two kind of reservations, one is on the resource pool, and one is for the VM itself.
So lets say you reserve 100000 MHz for the pool this means that if your CPU is 200000MHz half of it is reserved by this pool, and can't be used by any other pool.
Now lets say you have 11 VMs in that pool that you want to reserve 10000MHz for each of them (11 x 10000 = 110000) as you see it's more than what you have assigned to the Pool so one of the VMs can't be turned on.

It's not a good idea to reserve resources unless you have a good reason to do that.

You are saying that the maximum amount is reserved for this Pool, this means if you have any other resouces pools none of them has any resources when the VMs in this pool are running.

http://communities.vmware.com/thread/163602 

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