Strange formatting when creating PDF in Adobe

billelev
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I have a Word 2007 Template.  When I create a PDF in standard format, sometimes the header graphic has a line through it when printing using Default Settings: normal (Testing - standard.pdf).

If I print using Default Settings: Press Quality the lines are not there (Testing - press.pdf).

I used PDFCreator, and this also does not show the line (Testing - PDF Creator.pdf).

Each PDF shows the header image at the top in the header, and again in the main body.  The image only has a line/different shading in it in the header, not the main body.

Does anyone know what is going on here/how to prevent it?
testing---standard.pdf
testing---press.pdf
testing---PDF-Creator.pdf
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Commented:
Hi

In Distiller >Edit PDF Settings> General can you set 'Object level Compression' to OFF, recreate the PDF and see if this removes the line occurrence?

capt.

Author

Commented:
HI captainreiss,

I just tried that but the line is still there...see the attached image.
untitled.JPG

Commented:
Is this a solid fill or a shading with transparency. I thought that the OLC might flatten the object differently creating a 'doubled' object perception as the area clearly appears darker when done with standard settings.

Clearly here is a setting in your standard config responsible. The main difference between Press and standard  is the colour conversion, with press handling all in CMYK and Standard RGB.

Tricky to say what is responsible without trying so I suggest yous set the options in Standard one by one to the same as in the Press settings. I would start with the colour options. Then move to 'Advance'. Fonts and Standards should be identical anyway.

hth
capt.
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Author

Commented:
yes...I just changed the color settings to match the Press Quality settings (nothing else), and it seems to have removed the different shade.  However, if I click at the bottom of the heading, I can select half of the image somehow...So Adobe is still seeing the bottom part of the image differently...And I'm not sure why the same image, in the main body of the document is treated as normal.

Additionally...I have a portrait template, and I have never had this issue with the normal settings.  Very strange.
no-selection.JPG
bottom-section-selected.JPG

Commented:
Odd one, but that was the reason I thought OLC would do it, this is the way Adobe handles large areas by breaking them down into smaller chunks for fast screen draw etc. That way sometimes you see artefacts and breakup in different shades.

Author

Commented:
okay...just tried it with OLC OFF and it still produced the blocks.  No visible color difference, but blocked graphics.

Now this is interesting...In Word 2007 I have an Acrobat toolbar.  If I click Create PDF > Fully Functional PDF I get the different shading and blocks.

However, if I select Create PDF > Quick and Simple PDF I get no change in shading and no blocks.

Do you know why that is?

Commented:
The Adobe Toolbar uses Distiller to create the PDF, Word is using its own plugin, hence the changes are affected when you change the settings in Distiller and don't appear when you use Cute or Word's own.

So somehow the colour conversion affects this...in your settings profile are the options for the 'Device dependent data' identical between the press and Standard profiles?

Commented:
Cute=> PDF Creator...

Commented:
Just opened the standard one in Illustrator, but the colour stripes seem to only exist as image masks with no fill. But the darker strip is definitely a separate one so Adobe chops this up. And I suspect as part of this it distorts colour -perception.

The PDF creator verion is also chopped up but in maybe 25-30 narrow stripes that do no show any difference in colour.

The press one is chopped up as the standard and has no colour distortion.

I wonder if the same would happen with different colour bars, as a hunch it may be that the RGB creation interprets the half with the red/white strips differently to the pure blue one whilst the CMYK is more faithful to the colour

Author

Commented:
Device dependent data refers to...?

Commented:
These are rarely used settings in the color section, bottom half of the dialog box. You would normally not touch them unless you have issues with masks, hence just worth looking at and confirming that these are identical between the 2 profile settings.

Author

Commented:
no...they were different.  The press quality profile had "Preserve under color removal and black generation" checked.

hmm...I'm not sure what the take away from all this is.  It seems like Adobe sometimes has a hard time creating replica PDFs...So the safest thing is to go for Press Quality?

It just seems very inconsistent to me...

Commented:
Adobe is usually pretty good to do the ordinary tasks with great efficiency and little hassle. However it has a n odd habit that when things yield strange results to be difficult to diagnose. It is less an issue of consistency (as it consistently produces the undesired bar) more a question of finding the right setting for your source file

I suppose the question will need to be what the target for the PDF is (print or on screen) and the desired file size (does it need to be very small or is it portable at a slightly larger size that comes with Press settings)

You can use the High Quality print settings too, these don't compress your images but leaves the colour space untouched.

I can have a look at the document and test with local PDF profiles to narrow down the issue. It is tricky to pinpoint an exact remedy without the source file, could you upload the doc?

Author

Commented:
@captainreiss, that would be incredibly helpful, thank you.

I have attached the file.

The target audience is corporate, and it will be a downloadable file that will also be printed (I'm not sure the block carries over in to printed copies, however).  The files can be from 0.5 to 4MB in size, but I don't think the increase in quality will have that much of a noticeable affect.
sample.docx

Commented:
Interesting, I get similar results. I have run this using Word 2007 and Adobe Pro 9.4 using default Standard and High Quality print profiles

Standard produces a set of lines with alternating shading on page 1 page 2 however is perfectly fine, High quality has no issues at all and looks fine.

Will look into why this happens, but may not get a chance until 10 hrs from now as it is past midnight here....
std-sample.pdf
hq-sample.pdf

Author

Commented:
interesting...I've never seen lines like that!  only ever like the examples above.  The select tool selects either the top or bottom block.

Thanks again for looking into this.
Commented:
Ok, it seems that the distortion come due to the bicubic resampling. I have made all sort opf tests and it boils down to a simple setting on the resampling. The produced PDF from this does not show lines (see => sample.pdf)

The only change you need to do is to the 'Image' section of the job options. the standard prescribes 150dpi (for anything over 225) for both colour and gray scale images, although grayscale may not affect anything. Set these as indicated to 300 (450 adjusts automatically) (see =>sample settings.jpg)

All other settings are per default and the compression lines disappear. I think this may be down to the resolution of the image that you included and how it is handled.

To test this I did a crude drawing of your header image using Word Shapes and fills. I then PDF'ed it using the same Standard settings that produced the Lines. This time no lines appeared (see => New Draw_sample.pdf)
This confirms the finding that it is linked to the embedded image and the way this is interpreted in bicubic sampling. It does not explain the fact that page 2 and following occurrences of the same image are not distorted but I guess that is too much to hope for.

From what you said the effect that higher compression has (bigger file  size) may be acceptable. Depending on the final content you could expect  the HQ to be 3-4 times the size of the Standard, the redrawn image shows virtually the same size using Standard so this may be the route forward.

This gives you a workaround for your document. ultimately you will need to look at either the image itself and maybe change it or draw the header manually or live with the slightly bigger file size if higher compression is used.

hth
capt.

sample.pdf
New-draw-sample.pdf
sample-settings.jpg

Author

Commented:
Wonderful, thank you!  I just did a test and was able to reproduce the results you show.

The trade off has always been getting a good resolution for the header image (for when people zoom in) whilst at the same time keeping the picture file small.  The template I sent you had a very large size - 3508x581px.  This was to try to give good resolution when zooming, but had the unintended consequence of producing blocky images.

I experimented by reducing the image size by 2/3.  now, If I use the Standard settings, I don't get a blocky image (so no need to change the image settings).  However, the resolution is not as good.  I can improve the resolution of the header image by using Press Quality, and this does indeed increase the file size by 4 times.

So now at least I only have the problem of getting a good resolution at a small file size, rather than worrying about image side affects.

Commented:
The best method would be to use native resolution at the most common setting. As many users will have max 1600x1280 you have much picture depth for no gain.

I would choose 1600 width as max at a dpi of 96. Maybe even 1280 width. You can up the image quality inthe settings above from Medium to High or even Maximum to adjust your needs

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