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Creating VM in local ESXi datastore for backing up VM from SAN datastore

Hi All,

I'd like to know how did you configure your backup server as a VM ?

my idea is to utilize the local VMFS3 datastore on my 3x ESXi servers,
by installing the 3rd party application (like Veeam Backup 5 or Backup Exec 2010) into Windows Server 2008 R2 VM
equipped with very big hard drive size (8 GB OS + 1 TB data partition VMDK) on each of the local datastore to backup the VM inside the SAN.

What I've got:
VMware vSphere 4 Essential - ESXi 4.0 (no hot add)

Dell Power Edge 2950 with 2.5 TB multiple VMFS3 extent on top of - RAID 5 (6x 500GB SATAII 7200rpm)
Dell MD3000i iSCSI SAN over Gigabit Ethernet

The Windows Server 2008 R2 VM configuration:
2x CPU @ 2.33 GHz
4 GB RAM
VMXNet3 NIC --> for better connectivity of the backup between the local ESXi datastore and the iSCSI-SAN datastore.

Here is the reason I'm doing this is that:
1. I don't have the extra NIC to connect my physical server into the iSCSI SAN switch, therefore i can't use -SAN backup mode.
2. I only use the lowest VMware license available which doesn't support hardware Hot-add feature.

Would this be optimal configuration ?

Any kind of help and suggestion to implement VM backup as VM would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.
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jjoz
Asked:
jjoz
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2 Solutions
 
coolsport00Commented:
You could do it that way, but even if you're uneasy about placing b/u copies on local storage, you can use external storage as well. You can install/run Veeam from your workstation. You can connect an external drive to your workstation and Veeam will see that as a potential storage location to backup your VMs to. You have a good plan, or use external storage. Or, you can also create a new LUN on your SAN soley for b/u's, add that LUN as a datastore to your infrastructure and b/u to it. You don't need a dedicated NIC to do so.

Hope that helps.

Regards,
~coolsport00
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coolsport00Commented:
FYI - if you haven't purchased Veeam yet, you can download/install it on a trial basis for 30-60days (forget which) to test any of the suggested configurations to see what is best for you.

~coolsport00
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jjozAuthor Commented:
yes that's what I'm using now, because my current physical backup server is 99% full so i would like to make the backup server as the VM.

So in this case here's the configuration on the VM that I'd like to try:

Microsoft iSCSI software initiator - Windows Server 2008 R2

one vNIC - Enhanced VMXNet3 connected to the production network (Internal LAN subnet vswitch label)

one vNIC - Enhanced VMXNet3 connected for each iSCSI network connected to this ESXi (iSCSI LAN subnet vswitch label) ?
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coolsport00Commented:
Looks like you got it all figured out :)

~coolsport00
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jjozAuthor Commented:
well that's the thing that i haven't try yet, so I wonder if anyone in this forum implement this or am I the only one who is crazy enough to create VM to backup VM :-)
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coolsport00Commented:
I don't have that setup personally...I've ran them VM to datastore, and VM to local and mapped drive storage. There shouldn't be anything that would justify this to not work...at least that I can think of.

~coolsport00
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