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Can I have multiple gateways on a SBS 2008

Can I have multiple gateways on a server.

I have business cable for SBS and exchange. I also have a DSL line that I use very little for another application. Can I add a gateway on SBS for the DSL?  

Is there a better way to do this?  I just want a backup to get to the internet if I lose the primary internet connection. I understand my email will not come if the cable is down is there a way to fix that too?

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Alpha4043
Asked:
Alpha4043
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3 Solutions
 
nlandasCommented:
Yes, buy a router that supports two connections and bonds them to spread the load.
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ProtechCTCommented:
We do this already please see this link http://www.watchguard.com/products/xtm-main.asp


These are the types of routers we use...Very Good and user friendly.
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Alpha4043Author Commented:

Can you name a few routers that will do this?  Thanks
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nlandasCommented:
Here is one particular model...

http://www.dlink.com/products/?pid=452

Dual link load balancing - then the server is protected a little more by being behind the NAT and it only accesses the one gaetway.
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Todd GerbertIT ConsultantCommented:
To answer your first question - yes, you can have two default routes on your server.  They need to have different "metrics" - since only one will be used at a given time, it will be the accessible route with the lowest metric.
Although, that's not likely to be 100% seamless backup - i.e. if the cable goes out your cable modem will still be running, so the server is going to believe it's still a viable route - you would probably need to manually power-off the cable modem in order for the server to switch to the backup route.
At a command prompt you can run route /? for info on using the route command, the backup route would likely look like:
route add 0.0.0.0 mask 0.0.0.0 w.x.y.z metric nn
Where w.x.y.z is the IP address of the DSL modem/router, and nn is a number higher than the metric of your primary gateway.
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nlandasCommented:
Higher end less SOHO than the other two I listed -
http://www.sonicwall.com/us/products/TZ_210.html
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Alpha4043Author Commented:
tgerbert

So what would you suggest as the metric for the cable?         And the for the DSL?

Will the DSL ever be accessed or only if the cable modem is switched off?

I will know when the cable is off because my email to exchange will stop.

The other suggestions are great too!

Will the load balancing routers use both capacities of the cable and the DSL connections?

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Alpha4043Author Commented:
tgerbert

Do I need to change anything in the DNS on SBS 2008?

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Rob WilliamsCommented:
Using multiple gateways will not work in practice with a Windows server. The theory is when the primary gateway is not available it switches to the secondary (higher metric) and then switches back when the primary is available again. However with Windows it will never switch back unless you reboot the server. Windows will also warn you when trying to set a second gateway that it is not supported.

As others have suggested a dual WAN router is your only option. However there are problems with this in many situations:
-if you cannot switch off the load balancing feature and limit it to fail-over the way it works is the first client connection uses gateway 1 and the second gateway 2, and so on. If the two connections do not have similar upload/download speeds 1/2 of your users may experience reduced performance.
-Dual WAN routers work fine for most out going services but generally will not work for incoming connections like Exchange, RWW, VPN's.
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nlandasCommented:
@Alpha4043:
>Will the DSL ever be accessed or only if the cable modem is switched off?

Most likely only if the cable is switched off or disconnected. Also, what are you running for a firewall on the Windows server? In my experience you'll be safer if you deploy a hardware firewall/NAT solution.

@Alpha4043:
>Will the load balancing routers use both capacities of the cable and the DSL connections?

Yes, they load balance the data across the two connections. When means you not only get redundancy but a speed boost. The more expensive solutions from Watchguard and Sonicwall will have more data throughput.
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nlandasCommented:
   It's been my experience that Exchange will work behind a dual wan link, however, if you use your ISPs SMTP server as a relay, when the one link goes down you may run into relay issue. You can fix this by having your domain hosted with SMTP or not using relaying. The Cisco RV082 supports VPN, I didn't' read anything in it's documentation that it's VPN doesn't work in a dual connection setup.

    You may run into some issues with incoming port forwarding due to the ip changing. So if a user tries to come in on an IP from the cable modem and it's down, they won't get connected. If they then use the secondary IP, they get in.

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Rob WilliamsCommented:
>>" load balance the data across the two connections. When means you not only get redundancy but a speed boost"
It does not improve performance for a single user as the two connections are not aggregated, but if the two WAN connections have similar performance levels, it will improve over all network performance.

If mail is routed to your SBS and the primary link goes down it will not be routed to the second WAN link. You can set up an external DNS record with a lower priority pointing  to the second WAN link, however if using an SMTP relay you may have to change that as nlandas pointed out, and if not you will not have a reverse DNS record set up for the second Wan link and delivery to some mail servers will fail. You cannot however create a fail-over external connection for VPN, RWW, OWA, rpc/http.

The RV042 supports dual wan connections but the VPN only functions on WAN 1.

I know I sound like a pesimist but this is a very common question and although a dual WAN router is the best solution there are still many issues with doing so.
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nlandasCommented:
It's been 4 years since I set up the system with Exchange but if I remember we did Static IPs from both provider - MX record for each and used a specific authenticated relay for outgoing.

I haven't worked a lot with RWW or OWA.  For VPN you need a Dual Router that supports Tunnel Backup, which I think the RV082 does.

RobWill is certainly correct, it's not as simple as throwing in a dual WAN solution and being done. There is configuration on each service to make it work. I don't know but perhaps, there are solutions to RWW and OWA as well like there are for Exchange and VPNs?
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