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UNIX ksh parse year from date

Posted on 2010-11-09
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How to parse year fron date
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Question by:fcarleton
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by:mikepflu
Comment Utility
date +%Y
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by:fcarleton
Comment Utility
I need to expound more on the question.  How can I get year in YYYY format from date. A table of date formatting codes would be real helpful.  Patterned after Mikes reply: date +%Y.  That yeilds the YY segment of the full CCYY year value.
echo `date +%Y`
prints 10

Fc
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Assisted Solution

by:ozo
ozo earned 20 total points
Comment Utility
date +%y
prints 10
date +%Y
prints 2010
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Expert Comment

by:tel2
Comment Utility
By the way, there's no need to:
    echo `date +%Y`
because
    date +%Y
automatically prints to stdout.
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by:TRW-Consulting
Comment Utility
How about this:

  DateToParse="January 12, 1967"      # put whatever date you want here, in almost any format
  YEAR=`date -d "$DateToParse" +'%Y'`
  echo "The year is $YEAR"

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Accepted Solution

by:
woolmilkporc earned 30 total points
Comment Utility
The table of formatting codes is in "man date" or here (see attachment).
wmp

.

       %a      

            Displays the locale's abbreviated weekday name.

       %A

            Displays the locale's full weekday name.

       %b

            Displays the locale's abbreviated month name.

       %B

            Displays the locale's full month name.

       %c

            Displays the locale's appropriate date and time representation. This is the

            default.

       %C

            Displays the first two digits of the four-digit year as a decimal number (00-99).

            A year is divided by 100 and truncated to an integer.

       %d

            Displays the day of the month as a decimal number (01-31). In a two-digit field, a

            0 is used as leading space fill.

       %D

            Displays the date in the format equivalent to %m/%d/%y.

       %e

            Displays the day of the month as a decimal number (1-31). In a two-digit field, a

            blank space is used as leading space fill.

       %h

            Displays the locale's abbreviated month name (a synonym for %b).

       %H

            Displays the hour (24-hour clock) as a decimal number (00-23).

       %I

            Displays the hour (12-hour clock) as a decimal number (01-12).

       %j

            Displays the day of year as a decimal number (001-366).

       %k

            Displays the 24-hour-clock hour clock as a right-justified, space-filled number (

            0 to 23).

       %m

            Displays the month of year as a decimal number (01-12).

       %M

            Displays the minutes as a decimal number (00-59).

       %n

            Inserts a <new-line> character.



       %p

            Displays the locale's equivalent of either AM or PM.

       %r

            Displays 12-hour clock time (01-12) using the AM-PM notation; in the POSIX locale,

            this is equivalent to %I:%M:%S %p.

       %S

            Displays the seconds as a decimal number (00- 59).

       %s

            Displays the number of seconds since January 1, 1970, Coordinated Universal Time

            (CUT).

       %t

            Inserts a <tab> character.

       %T

            Displays the 24-hour clock (00-23) in the format equivalent to HH:MM:SS .

       %u

            Displays the weekday as a decimal number from 1-7 (Sunday = 7). Refer to the %w

            field descriptor.

       %U

            Displays week of the year(Sunday as the first day of the week) as a decimal

            number[00 - 53] . All days in a new year preceding the first Sunday are considered

            to be in week 0.

       %V

            Displays the week of the year as a decimal number from 01-53 (Monday is used as

            the first day of the week). If the week containing January 1 has four or more days

            in the new year, then it is considered week 01; otherwise, it is week 53 of the

            previous year.

       %w

            Displays the weekday as a decimal number from 0-6 (Sunday = 0). Refer to the %u

            field descriptor.

       %W

            Displays the week number of the year as a decimal number (00-53) counting Monday

            as the first day of the week.

       %x

            Displays the locale's appropriate date representation.

       %X

            Displays the locale's appropriate time representation.

       %y

            Displays the last two numbers of the year (00-99).

       %Y

            Displays the four-digit year as a decimal number.

       %Z

            Displays the time-zone name, or no characters if no time zone is determinable.

       %%

            Displays a % (percent sign) character.

       %Ec

            Displays the locale's alternative appropriate date and time representation.

       %EC

            Displays the name of the base year (or other time period) in the locale's

            alternative representation.

       %Ex



            Displays the locale's alternative date representation.

       %EX

            Displays the locale's alternative time representation.

       %Ey

            Displays the offset from the %EC field descriptor (year only) in the locale's

            alternative representation.

       %EY

            Displays the full alternative year representation.

       %Od

            Displays the day of the month using the locale's alternative numeric symbols.

       %Oe

            Displays the day of the month using the locale's alternative numeric symbols.

       %OH

            Displays the hour (24-hour clock) using the locale's alternative numeric symbols.

       %OI

            Displays the hour (12-hour clock) using the locale's alternative numeric symbols.

       %Om

            Displays the month using the locale's alternative numeric symbols.

       %OM

            Displays minutes using the locale's alternative numeric symbols.

       %OS

            Displays seconds using the locale's alternative numeric symbols.

       %Ou

            Displays the weekday as a number in the locale's alternative representation

            (Monday=1).

       %OU

            Displays the week number of the year using the locale's alternative numeric

            symbols. Sunday is considered the first day of the week.

       %OV

            Displays the week number of the year using the locale's alternative numeric

            symbols. Monday is considered the first day of the week.

       %Ow

            Displays the weekday as a number in the locale's alternative representation

            (Sunday =0).

       %OW

            Displays the week number of the year using the locale's alternative numeric

            symbols. Monday is considered the first day of the week.

       %Oy

            Displays the year (offset from %C) in alternative representation.

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