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No match for operator "<<"

Hello,
Im trying to compile boost's variant example which is given in boost web site.

 
#include "boost/variant.hpp"
#include <iostream>

class my_visitor : public boost::static_visitor<int>
{
public:
    int operator()(int i) const
    {
        return i;
    }
    
    int operator()(const std::string & str) const
    {
        return str.length();
    }
};

int main()
{
    boost::variant< int, std::string > u("hello world");
    std::cout << u; // output: hello world

    int result = boost::apply_visitor( my_visitor(), u );
    std::cout << result; // output: 11 (i.e., length of "hello world")
}

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But it gives an error like this

No match for operator "<<" ...    ...   ....     variant_io.hpp

What could be the problem?

Kind regards
0
vileda
Asked:
vileda
2 Solutions
 
HappyCactusCommented:
Here it compiles and work fine:

HappyCactus$ g++ --version
i686-apple-darwin10-g++-4.2.1 (GCC) 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5659)
Copyright (C) 2007 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

anaconda:b HappyCactus$ grep BOOST_LIB_VERSION /usr/local/include/boost/version.hpp
//  BOOST_LIB_VERSION must be defined to be the same as BOOST_VERSION
#define BOOST_LIB_VERSION "1_44"
anaconda:b HappyCactus$

Check carefully your compilation options and the include path. If you have multiple version of boost, remove all but the most recent. and upgrade boost.
0
 
evilrixSenior Software Engineer (Avast)Commented:
I too was able to compile it with gcc but not with Visual Studio. The code below makes it work. I suspect this is an issue in the Windows version of Variant or Visual Studio being useless.
#include "boost/variant.hpp"
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

class my_visitor : public boost::static_visitor<int>
{
public:
   int operator()(int i) const
   {
      return i;
   }

   int operator()(const std::string & str) const
   {
      return str.length();
   }

};

class ostream_visitor : public boost::static_visitor<std::ostream &>
{
public:
   ostream_visitor(std::ostream & out) : out(out)
   {
   }

   template <typename T>
   std::ostream & operator()(T const & t) const
   {
      return out << t;
   }

private:
   std::ostream & out;
};

std::ostream & operator << (std::ostream & out, boost::variant< int, std::string > const & u)
{
   return boost::apply_visitor( ostream_visitor(out), u );
}

int main()
{
   boost::variant< int, std::string > u("hello world");
   std::cout << u << std::endl; // output: hello world

   int result = boost::apply_visitor( my_visitor(), u );
   std::cout << result; // output: 11 (i.e., length of "hello world")
}

Open in new window

0
 
viledaAuthor Commented:
I'm trying to compile it from QNX Momentics Windows version. The include path seems ok and I have only one version.
0
 
HooKooDooKuCommented:
OMG... the number of errors I got when I tried to compile the sample using Visual Studio 2010.

However, I too got the same error about '<<' and could quickly realize that the problem (as Visual Studio sees it) is that 'ostream' didn't have the operator '<<' define for the template.  Evilrix's example seems to supply that missing operator.

In other words, under Visual Studio 2010, the "Hello World" program listed in the original post will not compile, but Evilrix's version with the added operator definisions does.
0

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