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iSeries Auto Device Types

Posted on 2010-11-11
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Last Modified: 2012-06-22
We are in the process of changing our emulation screen size from Model 2 (24x80) to Model 5 (27x132).  When we switch from Model 2 to Model 5, our users are directed to a different subsystem because their device type changes from 3477 to 5251.

Does anyone know why this would be happening? We want our users coming in from a normal PC emulation screen to come in as 3477. Only our RF devices (scan guns, forklift terminals, etc) should come in as 5251, thus putting them in the correct subsystem.

I appreciate any help you can offer.
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Question by:Matthew Roessner
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Gary Patterson earned 500 total points
ID: 34113366
What emulation program are you using?  Are you using named workstations, or just using default system-generated workstation names (QPADEVxxxxx)?

When using generic device names, the system system looks at the characteristics requested by the terminal, and attempts to connect to an existing generic device that provides the desired characteristics.  Apparently the 5251 device descriptions are the "best match" that is found with the new characteristics.

I connect using IBM i Access for Windows V6R1, and have a 132 column session configured.  Auto-config created a 3477 Model FC the first time I connected (I use a named workstation, so I always get the same DEVD).

You can try varying off all of the 5251 devices, and then connecting a 132-column session to see what device type is created.  May be that if there are some existing "perfect match" devices out there, they will get selected instead of the 5251.   You still run the risk of a 5251 devd getting selected if you ever run out of "perfect match" devices, so I recommend a different solution altogether:

Far and away the simplest solution is to use named devices, and to do your subsystem routing based on workstation NAME entries rather than workstation TYPE entries.  This gives you the most control, and also allows you to assign menaningful names (if desired) to each device.  That can be handy in system management and troubleshooting, for example to know where a user is located, or what department they belong to, or that a given device is an RF scanner, etc.

You can also create a custom routing program that moves the jobs to the right subsystem, assuming you can somehow figure out how to distinguish between the RF devices and a regular user.

- Gary Patterson
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