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PowerShell script that displays Exchange 2003 mail store deleted items disk consumption

Posted on 2010-11-11
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I would like to execute a Powershell script that would display the disk space consumed its mailboxes deleted items.  Currently my Exchange environment is 2003; therefore, I am unable run to utilize the commands available to Exchange 2007.
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Question by:jahhan
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7 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:Gitcho
ID: 34117837
#the exchange server name
$exchangeServer = "SERVER01"
#get all mailboxes
$2003server = Get-Wmiobject -namespace root\MicrosoftExchangeV2 -class Exchange_Mailbox -computer $exchangeServer
#strip system mailboxes
$2003server = ($2003server | ? {$_.DisplayName -notlike "SystemMailbox*"})
#calculate total size of deleted items
$deletedTotal = ($2003server | Measure-Object DeletedMessageSizeExtended -Sum).Sum
#total size in MB
([math]::round(($deletedTotal/1MB), 2))
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Author Comment

by:jahhan
ID: 34122342
This is what I need, however, is it possible to list the server values individually?  So far, when i run the script, it provides one value.
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LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:Gitcho
ID: 34123112
Not sure what you mean ... this script is only querying one server - so there is only 1 server value.   If you want to output the server name along with the total deleted items space, just change the last line to:

Write-Host $exchangeServer " has a total of " ([math]::round(($deletedTotal/1MB), 2)) "MB of delete items"

Open in new window


If you're asking to output the value of each USER's delete item total, then add this line:

$2003server | % { Write-Host ($_.MailboxDisplayName)":"([math]::round(($_.size/1KB), 2))  }

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Author Comment

by:jahhan
ID: 34123471
I have multiple servers listed in the $exchangeservers line, but when I run the script only one value is displayed, and this value seem as if its the total off all the servers values.
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Accepted Solution

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Gitcho earned 2000 total points
ID: 34123690
OK.  try this :

#load server names from file
$exchangeServer = gc "c:\files\list_of_servers_to_check.txt" #one server name on each line
#process each server
Foreach ($server in $exchangeServer) { 
	#get all mailboxes 
	$2003server = Get-Wmiobject -namespace root\MicrosoftExchangeV2 -class Exchange_Mailbox -computer $server
	#strip system mailboxes
	$2003server = ($2003server | ? {$_.DisplayName -notlike "SystemMailbox*"})
	#calculate total size of deleted items
	$deletedTotal = ($2003server | Measure-Object DeletedMessageSizeExtended -Sum).Sum
	#total size in MB
	Write-Host $server " has a total of " ([math]::round(($deletedTotal/1MB), 2)) "MB of deleted items"
}

Open in new window

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Author Comment

by:jahhan
ID: 34124013
Thanks for the script, is it possible to remove the write-host line and add script that will display the output on the results screen?
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LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:Gitcho
ID: 34125706
The write-host line *does* display the output on the screen.  If you don't want to display anything to the screen just delete that last line.
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