partition layout on redhat and Linux

could someone in simple Englist explain what is going on in these two lines word by word.  They are taken from a  Kickstart config file and relate to partition sises.  I want to modify them but dont understand them.  


part pv.100000 --size=8000 --grow
volgroup vg0 --pesize=32768 pv.100000
enigma1234567890Asked:
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arnoldConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Create a partition of 8000 MB
Create a Volume group vg0 with physical extent size of 32768 (not sure of the units bytes,kbytes,mbytes) versus the default 4MB  using the pv.10000

Then you would likely have lvm instruction to create the logical volumes within the Volgroup VG0.

http://linuxgazette.net/issue43/nielsen.kickstart.html
http://www.faqs.org/docs/Linux-HOWTO/KickStart-HOWTO.html

An example of a kickstart with LVM which is a closer match to your situation.
Your setup relies on a single disk being in the system .
http://www.redhat.com/archives/rhelv5-list/2007-October/msg00007.html
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arnoldCommented:
pe will create 32768MB of extents.

http://linux.die.net/man/8/vgchange
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enigma1234567890Author Commented:
what does this bit do --> part pv.100000 -
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enigma1234567890Author Commented:
sorry for got to past the complete pat I want to know what this line does
part pv.100000 --size=8000 --grow
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arnoldConnect With a Mentor Commented:
It creates partition and ceates a reference to it as pv.100000 of size 8000 MB --grow I think means is equivalent to create.

using the label eliminates the need to know which partition on which drive this process was running on.

i.e. the drive is /dev/sda
so when the part command rans, the partition could be /dev/sda1 /dev/sda2 etc. depending on whether there are other part commands before it.  Assigning the label to the partition means that when you want to create/define a volumegroup you would use the label instead of maintaining the count of the part command .

Please look at the link I posted, I think it does a much better job at illustrating and describing the whole process.
It further adds a RAID overlay to the LVM

In the example, the --ondisk=/dev/hda is used to direct a specific partition to a specific disk that is supposed to be in the system.  If this disk is not in the system this instruction will fail and so will the install attempt.
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