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NTFS Partition made in Linux not visible in Vista

Posted on 2010-11-14
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Last Modified: 2012-05-10
My laptop has 120gb harddisk , I created an ~60GB X2 partition initially and made it dual boot with fedora 9 and windows vista.  I realised that I am not using as much of the space in fedora as I initially thought so. So I decided to partition the disk space that holds fedora and reallocate some space to vista. I upgraded the fedora to fedora14 by reinstalling the OS. I then partitioned the linux volume using GPart during installation and created an 10GB partition out of the 60GB and formatted it as an NTFS partition. Now when I restarted my system and booted on to Vista, I hoped to see the 10GB partition (since I partitioned it as NTFS) but I could not see the partition at all. I checked with Run ->Diskmgmt.msc and it shows the whole linux partition still as ~60gb (please see the attached file).

Can some expert advice on how I could get the partition on windows vista ?

*I tried as adviced here http://www.go2linux.org/accessing-linux-drive-ext-with-vista but it is of no use, also some post advice against using this driver as the harddrive gets corrupted.

Kindly advice on this pls.

diskpart.jpg
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Question by:haravallabhan
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by:profjohan11
ID: 34132837
Hi,

I dont have a windows machine now to check the screens against. But it seems you must select it to assign drive letter. And then you should be able to use it.

i.e.

Click on the 53,2 gb partition on diskpart. You should have options if you right click like assign drive letters and paths.

Not sure.

Johan
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by:haravallabhan
ID: 34132913
I dont want to mount the entire linux partition /volume. I just want to see the newly created partition (10GB) formatted as NTFS file system in my windows vista
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by:profjohan11
ID: 34132923
Hi,

I am thinking that you can see it maybe it just shares a drive letter with your cd rom perhaps. i.e. change the drive letter of the 10gb partition to f: and then see if you see a different drive under windows explorer. Because the 10gb partition looks fine to me.

Johan
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Expert Comment

by:bz43
ID: 34132935
@haravallabhan: it shows the whole linux partition still as ~60gb.

From your picture I don't see any 60GB partition.  And from the picture it looks like you have a 112GB disk.

I can see your D drive is 10.61GB.  See my cropped image from your image below.  If you use Windows Explorer are you able to see the "New Volume: D"?  It should show up in Explorer.  Please check and let us know.  


diskpart-d.jpg
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by:bz43
ID: 34132944
From your picture you show two DVDs with drive letters E and F.
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by:profjohan11
ID: 34132964
then he must select different drive letter windows. I think the drive letters are shared and that is causing the confusion
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by:bz43
ID: 34132994
@profjohan11:  If I'm correct, I think it's fine.  If haravallabhan goes to Explorer he'll just see the 10GB NTFS drive show up with a long name like in the picture  below showing my "Y" drive ... haravallabhan's will show up with a D drive.
windowExploreremissing60gb.jpg
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by:haravallabhan
ID: 34133034
HI, The drive letters E: and F: are of the DVD drive one physical and one demon so kindly ignore that.

The drive letters arent shared D: Drive originally belongs to windows only. May be I should have mentioned this, the Windows partition which is 60GB is originally split into (C: and D: drive) I made it just to protect my data in D: in case C: gets corrupted due to dual booting. so (C+D = 60gb of Windows), The D Drive is showing as New Volume because I did not name it when I initially created it long time back.  I hope I am clear.

The ~10GB(shown as 11GB NTFSVOL) one that I am not seeing it in my windows is a new slice of partition that I created from the Linux original 60GB, the 11GB initially used to be /home with ext3 partition. I reformatted the whole drive into NTFS filetype. The 11GB NTFS has no data in it as it is 100% free. I want this to be used for windows vista as an additional drive (say G:)

I am attaching the screen shots from the link Disk Utility program.
linuxpartitions.png
totaldisksizes.png
windowsboot-cdrive.png
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by:profjohan11
ID: 34133048
Show us a print screen of your windows explorer perhaps
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by:bz43
ID: 34133186
If you're in Linux can you show us the output of the following command "df -h"?  Just type "df -h" at the terminal prompt without the quotes and show us the output if possible.  Command:
$ df -h
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by:bz43
ID: 34133247
From your root account can you do:
# /usr/sbin/lvscan
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by:haravallabhan
ID: 34133355
@profjohan11
Hi, my windows explorer screen.

windowsexplorer.jpg
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by:haravallabhan
ID: 34133379
@bz43

$ df -h
Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/VolGroup-lv_root
                       41G  3.8G   37G  10% /
tmpfs                 497M  260K  497M   1% /dev/shm
/dev/sda5             485M   47M  413M  11% /boot



# lvscan
  ACTIVE            '/dev/VolGroup/lv_root' [41.03 GiB] inherit
  ACTIVE            '/dev/VolGroup/lv_swap' [1.94 GiB] inherit
  ACTIVE            '/dev/VolGroup/Logical_Volume_02' [10.22 GiB] inherit
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Expert Comment

by:noxcho
ID: 34134796
Hey, your D: partition is the one that you look for. It is 10.61GB in size.
You are confused by different size reports possibly. Linux and Windows count the size different way thus you see 11GB in Linux and 10.61GB in Windows. But it is exactly the same partition. Your third picture in a set of pictures shows it exactly.
500MB + 53GB partitions are linux partitions.
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by:haravallabhan
ID: 34136139
Hi I will write down the break down of how the disk is partitioned here,

120 GB - Total Disk size

Partitioned as follows


60GB for Windows Vista
60GB for Fedora 14 Linux


60GB Windows Vista

4.88 GB Vfat
42.60 GB NTFS (C:Drive where OS is stored)
10.61 GB NTFS (named as New Volume) Where data is stored and is mapped as D: drive
500 MB Vfat

60GB Linux System (Fedora 14)

2.1GB Swap
44 GB ext4 (where fedora OS is stored)
11 GB NTFS (named as NTFSVOL *changed the volume name from new volume which is default naming to NTFSVOL to prevent confusion)
500MB ext4


It is this 11 GB NTFSVOL - a NTFS volume in the Linux system that I wish to see in Windows Vista, but it is not visible and I am unable to  mount it, However I could map and mount all volumes and partition in Linux including the Windows partition and volumes.
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by:noxcho
ID: 34136577
11 GB NTFSVOL in Linux =10.61GB in Windows.
Just browse the content of it in Linux and see if the data is the same in Windows.
These two systems count the size different way as I mentioned before thus it confused you.
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by:noxcho
ID: 34136610
See the size of the same volume in KBs in both Linux and Windows. I think it will be identical. Just browse it and see that data is the same under both OSes.
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by:haravallabhan
ID: 34137322
@noxcho

10GB D: Drive in windows (New Volume) have content and data.  The partition has never been touched and has been there for over 3 years now.

11GB (NTFSVOL) created in Linux is a newly partioned volume, I created this 2 days back by erasing the 60GB Linux partition that was previously running Linux Fedora9, and now installed with Fedora14. Now the Linux partion has as mentioned above

2.1GB Swap
44 GB ext4 (where fedora OS is stored)
11 GB NTFS (named as NTFSVOL)
500MB ext4


This 11GB Does Not have any content or data it is absoultely free, just formatted as an NTFS filesystem. It is visible in Linux but not in Windows, which I wanted it to be.

In running diskmgmt.msi from windows vista the 60GB Linux partition is shown as one chunk, unmountable. I ideally want the 11GB NTSC under the Linux partition to be in windows vista.
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Expert Comment

by:noxcho
ID: 34137793
Ok, looks like I got it. In Windows Disk Management you have 5 primary partitions which is impossible in Windows (if you do not use GPT drive).
Looks like partitions table of your Windows got screwed up completely.
Can you right click on HDD - Properties - volume and tell me what type of partition is listed there? MBR?
Also download and install trial version of Paragon Backup & Recovery 10 Home: www.drive-backup.com
Does it see the drive the same way like Windows? This very tool is useful when tracking the problems with HDD geometry so let's use its benefits.
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by:bz43
ID: 34137801
I'm not familiar with LVM (Logical Volume Management).  So, the information I'm writing below is only assumptions.

What if Microsoft Windows can not see a Linux LVM without some third party application?  I don't know the answer.  I did find this link that says it is an application for Windows to view LVM2 at http://ext2read.blogspot.com/
The program is named, ext2read and can be downloaded from, http://sourceforge.net/projects/ext2read/files/
I have no idea if that will work or my assumption is correct.

@haravallabhan, the pic you named, diskpart.jpg, I'm making the assumption that the 53.21GB partition at the end of the disk named, Disk 0, is your Linux partition.  And I'm making the assumption that Windows can't read the extended partition; including the 10GB NTFS partition you created within that 53.21GB partition reported in your diskpart.jpg.  I'm only making guesses here.  I'm not sure.  
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by:noxcho
ID: 34137950
bz43, you are correct. When installing Linux the drive could be converted into LVM style and thus you cannot see the partitions in proper way. Windows does not work with them directly, that is correct.
That's why did I ask to check the volume type via right click - volume.
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by:haravallabhan
ID: 34140086
@noxcho

I have the screenshot of the HDD properties volume. Yes it says it is MBR

I installed the Paragon backup and restore trial and here is the screenshot. I could nt get past this screen, because I could not select any of the disk or press Next button in it.

@bz43Date

Thanks for the ext2read it list the ext2 and ext4 file system in my linux partition but not the 11GB NTSE partition.

for ur query @haravallabhan, the pic you named, diskpart.jpg, I'm making the assumption that the 53.21GB partition at the end of the disk named, Disk 0, is your Linux partition.  And I'm making the assumption that Windows can't read the extended partition; including the 10GB NTFS partition you created within that 53.21GB partition reported in your diskpart.jpg.  I'm only making guesses here.  I'm not sure.  

You are absoultely right!
HDD-Windows-MBR.jpg
Paragon-Backup---Recovery--10-Ho.jpg
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Accepted Solution

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noxcho earned 500 total points
ID: 34140168
As you see on the screen shot of Paragon your HDD is marked as LVM.
Man, this is a trap. You either need to live with this configuration and reallocate the 11GB space back to linux partitions or delete linux partitions, create NTFS one right after 10GB partition in Windows and only then reinstall Linux.
Windows does not support work with volumes inside LVM structure so you could hardly do anything with it.
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Author Closing Comment

by:haravallabhan
ID: 34157875
Got good insight
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Expert Comment

by:noxcho
ID: 34460321
My suggestion is to accept noxcho's comment ID: 34140168 as clear instructions were given there.
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by:LeeTutor
ID: 34671377
This question has been classified as abandoned and is being closed as part of the Cleanup Program.  See my comment at the end of the question for more details.
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